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mygif

Has anybody who reads this blog ever bought a CD single?

*waves* Yup, back in my Nine Inch Nails completist days. It was the only way I got to hear certain songs.

I’m much better now.

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mygif

Also, new ‘Canadian DMCA’ legislation about to come down the pipe. Apparently they want to make everything illegal AND keep us paying the copying tariff.

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mygif

I have at least fifteen different Depeche Mode singles. >_>

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mygif

Ah, c’mon. Coldplay isn’t trying to be Radiohead. They’re trying to be U2.

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mygif

I find it hilarious that the music industry still insists that downloading hurts sales. I wouldn’t buy a pair of pants before trying it, and nowadays I wouldn’t buy a CD before trying it.

I realise my analogy is the littlest bit off, but honestly, people who download and never buy were never going to buy in the first place.

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mygif

And then there’s people in my situation, who prefer music that actually can’t be found anywhere under the domain of the RIAA and CRIA. But, hey, I can understand that – not everyone wants the same kind of music others like.
But I hate the idea that the RIAA might be eventually trying to sue me for downloading music that isn’t theirs.

Seriously, though, I can’t wait to see the record industry actually change…
…or, you know, curl up and die. I think I like that one better.

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mygif

I think I’m going to borrow your talking points, both for personal use and to keep me from shooting my mouth off about the RIAA the way I did when you linked to Comics212. Thank you.

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mygif

Has anybody who reads this blog ever bought a CD single?

I bought the David Hasselhoff single “Jump in my car” to try and get it to Number One in the UK music charts. (It got to number two).

JmC
I’m sorry. So, so sorry.

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mygif

I’m not necessarily a Creed fan… honestly… But I also happen to be a graduate of the Royal Conservatory of Music (which, I think allows me to comment on music seeing as how I’ve dedicated my life to it) and as much as you’d like to pump your knowledge of the industry and thus gain credibility to comment on certain musical genres (i.e. modern rock, pop, top 40), you should really have a look at what you’re saying before you publish it. I’m sure based on what you’re writing (and this is TOTALLY a sweeping generalization) that you’re into the most obscure indie nonsense that exists and only consists of two chords and maybe a bridge… Again, this is an assumption. The reality of it is that Creed, as much as we dislike them because of their religious bent and so on and so forth, is an extremely talented group of musicians that write music that is the equivalent of enjoying a Chuck Klosterman novel. You may disagree, you may find it pretentious, you may even indulge in the guilty pleasure of the fact that it is catchy, but you’re also not breaking ground by letting the world know that you dislike it for fear of being part of the masses. At the end of the day, Creed plays their instruments and writes their songs and should not be lumped in with Britney Spears because you want to let the world know that you’re so different and original by hating a band that sold 30 million records. We get it. You probably hate Linkin Park too… wonderful… Please have something more intelligent to say next time instead of dropping the name of a group that broke up three years ago because you think it somehow contributes to your cred. You’re kicking a horse that is not only dead, but buried. In the meantime, why don’t we all pick the low-hanging fruit and talk about shitty the Backstreet Boys are… Dude… you’re weak…

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mygif

Actually, I quite like Linkin Park and generally avoid indie-for-indie’s-sake. (I think “Faint” is one of the best videos ever made.) My argument that Creed are/were shit is based on me thinking they’re shit.

P.S. “On the other hand, if you think it’s one of the men, this argument will seem relatively trivial in comparison to your positive aids test.” Classy.

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mygif

I always get a little suspicious when someone claims that they’ve ‘asked Canadians’. I’m Canadian, and no one’s ever asked my opinion…

Never bought a single. Not really a fan of listening to the same song rehashed three to four times over. And I never asked for all the (wonderfully censored) multimedia criap (sic) on the CD.

Who’s idea was that anyway? Can’t really drag the old IBM in the car with me when I go to work, which seems to be the case with some CDs these days.

Oh, by the way, is it illegal when I listen to a song on my car radio? Or when I get a CD from the local library? Yes, the owning organization paid for it, but I’m not (Just as someone had to buy that first CD to upload), nor are the potential thousands who also listen in. Have I, Mr. Henderson, failed in my duty? Or just stepped in yours?

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mygif
J. Bryan Shoup said on December 3rd, 2007 at 10:47 am

Patrick,

The difference with the library and the car radio is that you’re not keeping a copy for yourself. The library is lending you the cd on the assumption you won’t burn a copy. Recording songs off the radio is technically illegal, if generally ignored since it’s hard to get a decent recording off the radio that can be illegally distributed.

However, illegal downloadings/illegal burning/illegal copying is not illegal simply when you distribute it. It’s illegal because you (or whoever is doing it) are possessing commercially-released work that you did not pay for.

It’s the same reason I don’t download scans of comics. At the end of the day, we’re beholden to our own conscience, but when a work is available commercially that I cannot access temporarily and legally (in a library, etc.) I feel irresponsible taking it illegally.

Such actions MAY spur purchasing habits (such as Mr. Bird’s, in the case of comics), but it still requires doing something morally dubious in my book. Situational ethics becomes a slippery slope, and I can’t help but think SOME people (and I not accusing anyone here) paint the media industries as evil simply because they don’t like paying for things and they want to justify their dubious actions. “I want it to be free,” so the people keeping it from being free are painted as enemies. Sort of like the tagger culture in Austin, Texas villfying the cops for preventing them from vandalizing state property.

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mygif

Good point, honestly hadn’t occurred to me when I fired off my quasi-knee jerk response.

I guess what I was trying (and failing, looking back at the post I made) to articulate was the concern over how far groups like CRIA would go in ‘protecting’ copyright. Two greased up sides to every slope and all that.

Patrick

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