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mygif

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_gas_field#Offshore_gas_fields isn’t what you want?

Why sequester it when we can tap it and use it to heat our homes better than oil? Even taxis are switching to it!

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mygif
Homewardbounder said on September 29th, 2008 at 2:18 pm

http://www.scirus.com

“oceanic methane” + Sequestration gives this:

doi:10.1016/j.petrol.2006.03.031

which might be useful in you can tap up someone with ATHENS access to get the paper. Scirus is pretty good for kind of query.

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mygif

One of my usual go-to guys for this sort of thing would be Jamais Cascio, whose personal blog is Open the Future, and who is a cofounder of worldchanging.com, a “bright green” environmentalism site.

Unfortunately, according to his initial blog post on the news, if it is the methane hydrates / clathrates, we’re so fucked. Methane is harder to do anything about than CO2 is. So, uh, you can look into temperature mitigation by geo-engineering, some of which he very briefly mentions in the post, see what worldchanging.com has to say, or continue Googling. Hey, and in the meantime, you can always elect a majority government that doesn’t want to do anything about AGW anyway. (Yes, as someone from the US, I should be more careful with my glass house.)

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mygif
Mad Scientist said on September 29th, 2008 at 10:43 pm

Meh, we just have to throw enough particulate matter into the atmosphere to reduce the amount of sunlight that hits the surface. That’ll make the excess heat retention of greenhouse gases critical rather than disastrous.

…and yes, I *know* that’s a miserable ‘solution’. :D

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mygif

I don’t, and I’m deeply ashamed that you’re asking for good sites on “potential oceanic methane sequestration technologies” while I’m looking up Nevada brothels on Wikipedia. :)

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mygif

Hmm… potential oceanic methane sequestration technologies… Nevada brothels… I think Mr. Seavey just might be on the right track. Let’s get to work.

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mygif
Mad Scientist said on September 30th, 2008 at 11:53 am

Field research!

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mygif

i’ve never heard of anything like that. but i’ll tell you a fun theory that rarely some clathrates will open up under a boat, which fizzies up the water and makes it much less dense and everything sinks right quick.

what are you talking about, exactly? have you heard someone saying we should store methane in the sea?

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mygif

I’m thinking more along the lines of capture/mining of clathrates and hydrates.

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mygif

i know that mining is thought about, if not tried- one problem is that thing i talked about, another is ignitey-go-boom. i don’t have the freshest knowledge here, but we did talk about them in both my alternative energy and climatic change courses a few years ago. as far as i remember, it was the japanese who were most interested in mining. but that was for purposes completely the opposite of sequestration.

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