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Christian said on May 11th, 2009 at 1:05 am

I can’t believe you guys haven’t realized this yet

Spock Prime and (to a lesser extent) Nero represent the fans. At about the point where people started whispering ‘wait… Vulcan blowing up messes up Star Trek 2 and 3’ Nimoy shows up and explains the whole time travel/divergent universe thing. He, like us, know how things are SUPPOSED to work and helps set them on the right path

that said i agree with the consensus. Bana needed more OOMPH! and i thought the movie has a whole needed more scale. the entire thing felt claustophobic

but it was a fun movie, and the more i think about it the more i enjoy it

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Few things:
Coincidences abound, agreed, but Kirk and Spock ending up on the same planet made total sense. The coincidence was that he found the CAVE Spock was in. Then again, it was close to the Starfleet station so maybe that wasnt such a huge stretch either. It certainly isn’t a deal breaker.
1. Kirk was a stowaway and wasn’t supposed to be on the ship in the first place and he was a potential problem (mutiny) if he stayed on the ship given the circumstances of it being a ship with easily swayed cadets. So Spock, logically, decided to send him to the nearest Starfleet station on their way to the rally point.
2.Old Spock was there because Nero wanted him to be in a place where he could watch his planet die just before his own, slow, death.
3. The ship was badly damaged when Pa Kirk rammed it with the Kelvin so I imagine they were repairing it. Plus, Nero was obsessed with Spock and wanted to punish him more than anything, so he was waiting for Spock to come through the black hole before doing anything. Stupid? Yes, but no one ever accused Nero of being smart. He was just crazy.

Sure, the movie had some problems but nothing that was a deal breaker and it was still better than just about everything else that’s come down the pipe. Kahn was certainly a more quality movie, but this was just more FUN to watch, which is why I think it’s the best.

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Ok, just got back from the movie. On the plot front the thing I really didn’t understand (and this might be because I’ve had a long week and I’m pretty out of it) is Spock-Prime’s mind-meld explanation of how he got back in time. I mean, you’ve got 1. the fastest ship ever and 2. an exploding star, but you’re still not fast enough. It seems like Spock would KNOW if he was going to make it or not before he left. It just didn’t make any sense to me.

The movie itself was a good summer film, but I think the constant action produces diminishing returns rather than building excitement. The thing I didn’t really like was the “Chosen One” nature of the way the movie treats Kirk. You never see him actually working for anything. He’s not even an academy graduate but he’s given the role as first officer after he stows away, because of his father? He reacts and guesses and he’s ALWAYS right. I expect that from TOS Kirk, but TOS Kirk had a decade of experience under his (ever expanding) belt. Kirk and NuKirk are both be green-chick banging swaggering assholes, but NuKirk hasn’t earned it yet.

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Having seen the movie and reading MGK’s post, I have to comment about a couple scenes that apparently didn’t bother other people.

*spoilers here on out*

Is it just me or is the scene with very young Kirk and the car completely self-aggrandizing and could have just been left in the cutting room floor? There were a few shots that opened threads that went completely unanswered. Who was the guy that was yelling at Kirk? Who was the boy that he passed? Why was he doing all this? The only thing that that scene tells us is that he’s a rebellious punk. But his next scene does a pretty good job establishing that by picking a fight with 4 cadets.

The other scene that bothered me was when Scotty and Kirk beamed back to the Enterprise. Scotty got beamed into this giant water reclamation system. The set designers did a wonderful job of showing a utilitarian engineering room. Why then does this waterslide sized pipe completely snake around the room with little to no apparent reason?

Don’t get me wrong, I loved the film and want to see it again, if only so that I can see and spot Randy Pausch (the last lecture guy) in the film. He had a cameo before he died, and I’m sorry to have missed it.

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There were a few shots that opened threads that went completely unanswered. Who was the guy that was yelling at Kirk?

His step-father. That was actually fairly obvious.

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“Unfortunately, the story is not only nonsense, but it’s rather stupid. It hangs on such a ridiculous amount of contrivances to get anything in it to happen.”

So, typical Trek?

“Secondly, do most Romulan mining vessels have weapons?”

I was more surprised by the fact it didn’t have a cloaking device. Cause, seriously, sneaky-ass conniving traitorous Romulans?

And that ship looked like it was on its way to a casting call for Hellraiser! In! Space! III.5!

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Um……. Don’t get me wrong, I loved the movie, but that really fast federation ship (I forget the name) WAS the Gungan submarine from Star Wars episode 1. Seriously, blue triangle with spinning tails? How does no one else notice that?

But yeah, otherwise, Awesome movie.

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“While it’s true that Nero is no Khan, I would argue that, if you remove Khan from the equation, Nero compares decently well to all the other Trek movie villains.”

I’d rank him fourth, behind Khan, the Borg Queen, the General Chang; those three were the really exemplary ones. Nero falls into the “adequate” category, along with the Klingon commander from III and Tolian Soran.

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I agree with your assessment of Nero, SC.

@BringtheNoise
“Oh, arse. The only time that happened was when Spock-Prime told Kirk to play nice with NuSpock. I mean, are you actually complaining that Sulu, Scotty, Uhura, etc are in a Star Trek film?”

Yes. And I’m going to marry a carrot.

“Oh, and did you read the article. “The plot and script have been designed expertly to work for both audiences, in a manner reminiscent of nothing so much as how Pixar films successfully work as both kid-friendly entertainment and adult-savvy commentary on primal human issues”

That sounds like praise for the story to me.”

Seems like I did indeed missed that point.

“…Wouldn’t be the Internet without fanboys desperately trying to tear down something they claim to love I suppose.”

Well, that’s a sweeping generalisation. And not a particularly sapient one in this case: I pointed out all the things I found fantastic in the movie, I praised the parts of the movie I liked, and criticised the parts of the movie I felt didn’t work. It’s called an “opinion”.

But then, it wouldn’t be the internet with posters just attacking other posters without thinking through their posts, I suppose.

@Z
“‘Unfortunately, the story is not only nonsense, but it’s rather stupid. It hangs on such a ridiculous amount of contrivances to get anything in it to happen.’

So, typical Trek?”

Unfortunately…. yep.

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General agreement here. I liked Bones best, and was surprised to find Quinto can act (damn Heroes writers).

One quibble: two sweet jumps for Kirk and none for Pike?

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Anyone else notice the tribble in the cage in Scotty’s “office”? It was easy to hear but I would have missed seeing it if my friend hadn’t told me about it before I went to see the movie.

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Really? That’s so funny. I didn’t notice.

Also, the bottle Kirk smacks the starfleet guys with? According to my friend, it’s Sorium Brandy or Romulan Ale (I forget which).

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Clambone said on May 13th, 2009 at 9:42 am

I liked the movie a lot, and was willing to accept a lot of the coincidences, but one thing stuck in my craw:

The brilliant, reasonably experienced Commander Spock is doing an outstanding job as acting captain of holding it together and captaining the ship in the face of incredible odds. His plan to rendevous with Starfleet sounded pretty good to me.

Here comes Kirk, a 25 year old college junior. He comes onto the bridge and taunts Spock about his heritage, the genocide of his race, and the recent death of his mother. He taunts Spock to the breaking point. The whole stunt is transparently in order to assume the role of Captain.

If I didn’t know that Kirk is The One, that looked like the cruelest power play I’d ever expect to see. Would you ever tell someone who just watched their mother die that he never loved her? Christ.

I’d like to think that on the cutting room floor, there are two more scenes- one in which Uhura slaps Jim and takes him to task for his actions, and one in which Jim apologizes to Spock.

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1. His plan to rendezvous with Starfleet would have meant Earth being destroyed. Spock was too blinded by trying to keep his emotions in check and do the proper thing to see it.
2. Old Spock told him to do it, so while it was a shitty thing to do he kinda got a free pass on it. Uhura did look like she wanted to beat the living shite out of him though. I think NuSpock, once he’d calmed down, realized why Kirk did it.
3. I’m pretty sure Kirk was about to graduate early “I’ll do it in three!”, hence the Kobioshi Maru test. Kirk is a genius, after all.

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