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It’s a good ‘un, but I wouldn’t say it’s the best. Maybe the most accessible, though Of The City Of The Saved… is pretty easy to get into, but WoU is *nowhere* near as good as The Book Of The War.
I recently posted a longer look at the first few FP books on my blog, BTW – http://andrewhickey.info/2011/01/03/eschatology-escapology-4-faction-paradox/

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Semirelated link is semirelated: Have y’all and Our Host seen this one?

Like all really good Doctor Who stories, it’s a scary tale – by current showrunner, Steven Moffat

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LashLightning said on February 7th, 2011 at 3:01 pm

“All the Alternative Universes where the Roman Empire didn’t fall go to war with all the Alternative Universes where Nazis won WWII” is quite possibly the greatest ever summary known to man.

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@Andrew Hickey: The Book of the War is wonderful, don’t get me wrong; in fact, I’ve liked all of the FP books to date (and the audios, as well.) But “Warlords” has the best core concept of all of them, and Parkin executes the hell out of it. I’d recommend all of them, but I’d recommend “Warlords” first.

@John: Thanks for the link! I have read it (I have a copy of Decalog 3, the anthology where it first appeared) but it’s always nice to point people to a great short story. I consider that one to be the “ancestor” of this year’s Christmas special. :)

(Fun side note: In the original anthology, the little girl the Seventh Doctor saved wound up creating a nanite plague that the Fourth Doctor had to stop. That was the theme of the anthology; the Doctor makes a minor change to history in each story, one that his past or future self encounters. The last story, of course, leads into the first.)

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An infinite number of Romans vs and infinite number of Nazis? Yeah, I can see myself reading that.

Is it accessible if you’ve not followed Dr Who/read the Dr Who books etc?

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“Is it accessible if you’ve not followed Dr Who/read the Dr Who books etc?”

Yes.

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Kid Kyoto:
There’s one, single, reference to Doctor Who in the entire thing, and that’s done in a sort of knowing in-joke way. To be honest, you’re missing more of it if you’ve never seen Monty Python’s Life Of Brian, or never read Graves’ I, Claudius (the whole thing is written in a rather good pastiche of Graves’ style), or don’t know enough Latin to get the punning names Parkin put in.
Which is to say, you’re missing essentially nothing – it’s a stand-alone novel with only the most tangential connections even to the other books in the Faction Paradox series, which themselves have only a tangential connection to Doctor Who.

None of the Faction Paradox books require any knowledge of Doctor Who, but The Book Of The War and Dead Romance are improved by that knowledge in a sort of “oh, that’s clever what he did there” way. The rest of them don’t even have that much of a connection.

(You will, however, need to be very familliar with Doctor Who to read Parkin’s Doctor Who novels if you enjoy Warlords Of Utopia and want to read more – he plays around *hugely* with continuity and references in his other stuff).

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I know this is a very late comment, but I wanted to thank you for the book recommendation. I couldn’t put my copy down!

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