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malakim2099 said on April 2nd, 2011 at 3:37 pm

Good to hear, I was on the fence with this one. :)

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Lance Lunchmeat said on April 2nd, 2011 at 4:04 pm

It plays out like a feature-length episode of The Twilight Zone. Meaning it’s pretty damn great.

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Yeah, I pretty much fucking loved it. I’m looking forward to a repeat viewing. So much was done well in that film, from the script right on down.

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Bill Reed said on April 2nd, 2011 at 4:38 pm

Awesome. I was worried about this one.

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My problem with “assuming you can get past the scientific handwaving necessary to make the plot work” is that I felt like the movie sells out its own premise in the last five-to-ten minutes or so. I’ll avoid enough detail to spoil it for anyone who hasn’t seen it, but there’s a point where the hero has won as much of a victory as he can within the rules of the universe we’ve spent the last two hours (or whatever) watching, and if it ended on that, er, moving freeze-frame, I would’ve been really happy. Instead the movie keeps going, contradicting the sci-fi logic it already established for us, in a way that I haven’t been able to make any sense of, and the whole thing basically felt like “you thought we were taking our own premise seriously, but as it happens LoveMagic can conquer the rules of fake-physics!” The ultimate “happy ending” of it, though something movies do a lot, also bugs me, but it’s a less specific complaint.

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Medrawt: they tossed the word ‘quantum’ around enough that I’m willing to ascribe the happy ending to a version of the many-worlds hypothesis.

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I disagree that it sells-out its concept. There are multiple lines by Jeffrey Wright’s character that establish the possibility of the ‘breaking of the rules’ that happens at the conclusion. (There’s a second twist after that which I haven’t decided how it fits, but I only got out an hour ago.)

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I was thinking about the “many worlds” thing, because that’s the only way it could work, but I still don’t think it makes any particular kind of sense, though teasing out why would be sort of tedious – even if it did though, this becomes one of those situations, as I alluded to, where we walk away with a “happy ending” that I can’t buy as one after a few minutes of thinking about it.

This is going to get a LITTLE spoilery, without any particular detail.

For one thing, if there’s a many worlds situation going on, then over the course of the film there were, what, 10 different iterations that we saw, all of which keep going after the eight minutes are up. And in each of those, except for the very last one that we see, they’re going to try the Source Code with that universe’s own Gyllenhaal, who’s going to take a number of tries to complete his mission, so all HIS failed attempts spin off … etc. I suppose you could imagine that while this creates an infinite regress of universes, each Gyllenhaal will eventually get his happy ending.

EXCEPT it’s a happy ending where he’s starting a romance with a woman he doesn’t really know, who’s been crushing on a guy that isn’t him, and just happens to be temporarily impressed that – because it’s a different him, and one who knows he’s only got eight minutes – he was bold enough to make his move. Well, ok, that’s great, except he’s in the body of this other guy, who’s got a whole life he doesn’t know about, a job he doesn’t know how to do, etc. – seems like a hassle, except OH WAIT so in every universe where Gyllenhaal fails to save the train, the guy whose body he occupied dies, and in every universe where he succeeds, that guy dies anyway, because his consciousness has been displaced by Gyllenhaal! He’s the only person that doesn’t, somehow or other, get saved. The true hero of the movie is the schlub whose face Gyllenhaal is unhappy to see in the mirror! Sean Fentriss died so the rest of us could gaze at the reflection of Michelle Monaghan in the Bean.

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Spoilers herein are still vague, but less so.

I prefer to look at it as: Coulter jumped to each of those ten or so worlds (out of the gazillion that exist), for eight minutes at a time (or “until his death in the world,” actually; twice he stays out past the eight-minute mark) and then gets pulled back into the main movie universe each time. The last one’s interesting because he doesn’t have a life in the main movie universe to be pulled back into. This time if he dies in the Matrix he dies in real life– but there’s no reason for him to die in the Matrix just because he died in real life.

(Counterevidence: the sequence where Christina’s face is breaking up. I got nothing.)

Sean Fentriss died so the rest of us could gaze at the reflection of Michelle Monaghan in the Bean.

Yeah, that was bothersome (both the death and the ‘relationship with a girl he doesn’t know’ parts). I had to work very hard not to think about that part, because I knew if I did it was going to ruin the upbeat ending of the movie for me.

Also and unrelatedly, Vera Farmiga is 100% awesome.

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[…] הגעתי במקרה לביקורת במשפט אחד על הסרט. בעקבותיה יצאתי לבדוק מי הם היוצרים של הסרט […]

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Die Macher said on April 4th, 2011 at 10:36 am

I disagree. Vera Farmiga is 4,000% awesome.

The odd thing about the movie, I thought (and we’re well into spoilerland, right?) was that it only makes sense once you reach the final explanation, essentially the many-worlds theory.

Otherwise, how would the memories of Sean Fentriss know who the bomber was, about the white van, the gun in the closet, etc etc? As Wright originally presents it, as “reliving the memories of this one guy’s last 8 minutes alive”, it would make NO sense. Luckily, it turns out that’s not what is really happening!

I thought it was funny that Jeff Wright proclaims the program a success even though he also says Jake might be the only person for whom Source Code even works; and has also said Jake was linked to Fentriss because of similarity in age, physical characteristics, etc. “We can prevent any disaster, so long as it is preceeded by a smaller disaster with the same root cause, and so long as that smaller disaster claims the life of a thirtysomething white male around 5’11”, 190 lbs.”

All that said I really enjoyed the movie. :-)

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The explanation given early in the movie certainly doesn’t make sense given the movie’s events. Since we’re into spoiler territory anyway…

How could Fentriss’ memories possibly contain things like leaving the train to tussle (and then get hit by a train), get shot in a van, tasered when going for a gun, etc.? From the get go it had to be more Quantum Leap than reliving memories.

So then my question is, does Rutledge actually know what’s happening (new universe creation), or is he as ignorant as the rest? (I don’t buy the ignorant defense – I’m not sure anyone on the project should believe the last 8 minutes of someone’s memory bit when they’re telling him to get a gun).

So another question: did the parallel universes exist beforehand, or are they forced into existence due to time travel causing burifcation?

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Drag Balls said on May 2nd, 2011 at 2:54 pm

coren, I’d say the latter: a new universe is created by the time travel.

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