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mygif

Look, I read the first three books a couple years back, it’s not like I have them in front of me nor am I going to check the books out of the library or borrow them from my friend again to see where the glaring omissions in my opinions lie. I remember generalizations regarding the plots, the biggest points that stuck with me were the ones that I viewed as plot holes, the ones I mentioned earlier. If there was a mention of there being no cure for vampirism in book three I do not recall it. I recall book three ending with Dresden all but sealing himself in his work shop trying to find a cure for his girlfriend. If it was mentioned there was no cure for vampirism in book four I did not get to that part of the book before I stopped reading.

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mygif

I should have followed this argument a little more carefully. Tom, you said a long time ago that he liked the Codex Alera series. I’m sorry. I could have just scrolled up…

We need to let this die, but I can kind of see where Zach is coming from. Jim Butcher has a web site where you can find a synopsis for each book in the Dresden Files series and you can find summaries on Wikipedia. If you’re on the Internet already, it’s not that much trouble to do a quick Google search to refresh your memory. IIRC, a couple of the things you mentioned were addressed in Wikipedia’s entry for book three. Just sayin’…

I just got done rereading Storm Front, and Harry says several times that he can’t get help from anybody because he doesn’t have time and/or the people he describes as his “usual allies” are unavailable. So, that would kind of explain why Michael Carpenter wasn’t around for book one… even if it hadn’t been established in book three that they met for the first time “off panel” at some point after book two.

I understand not liking Michael’s wife, but her character being mean to Harry isn’t really a plot hole.

… especially when you consider that the Carpenters are devout Catholics and both of them object to Harry using magic for religious reasons. Michael is just nicer about it.

Every time Charity got mad at Harry, it made sense to me. But what do I know, right? I thought that bathrobe thing that bothered you so much was funny. I understand that “mileage may vary” applies here.

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mygif

On the one hand you say we should let this die, then on the other you take a parting shot at me. Nice. I am not so involved with the argument where I am going to suddenly research each and every nuance of the series to defend myself. As I keep repeating I am going by what I remember, why should I suddenly start doing homework for a series I have no love for?

God, people. It’s not like I said Jim Butcher eats cats or something. I simply said I am not a fan of his better known series and explained why and I am attacked when I tried to end the argument amicably. I guess being polite on the internet is a sign of weakness or something.

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mygif

Look, I read the first three books a couple years back, it’s not like I have them in front of me nor am I going to check the books out of the library or borrow them from my friend again to see where the glaring omissions in my opinions lie. I remember generalizations regarding the plots, the biggest points that stuck with me were the ones that I viewed as plot holes, the ones I mentioned earlier. If there was a mention of there being no cure for vampirism in book three I do not recall it.”

Then that’s your fault and you shouldn’t get so defensive when you are blatantly told you are wrong by people who read the books. Also, just FYI, Michael’s wife has an actual reason for disliking Harry (and for some reason, disliking the guy who takes your husband out on jobs from which he comes back with numerous injuries makes you a tool, oh, and she changes in later books in regards to Harry).

“I recall book three ending with Dresden all but sealing himself in his work shop trying to find a cure for his girlfriend. If it was mentioned there was no cure for vampirism in book four I did not get to that part of the book before I stopped reading.”

Then again. Your fault. Quit being so defensive. If you don’t like them? Great. Your reasoning, frankly? Sucks. You’re wrong, factually, on multiple counts.
And shouldn’t trying to discover a cure be a good sign there is no cure?

Stop taking this poor little wounded martyr act, admit you were wrong and move on.

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Candlejack said on March 22nd, 2011 at 12:43 pm

Unless you believe Tom is lying about how he remembers the books, you’re laying it on pretty thick, Zach. In fact, the line between making your point and being an asshole may be in your rearview mirror. Just let it go, man. Let’s all just let it go.

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mygif

Silver Age Hawkman was awesome, back when he was Katar Hol and back before they decided to make him the right-wing asshole to counter Green Arrow’s preachy earnestness. The character as seen in “Showcase Presents Hawkman” is great, and I deal with the rest of it by pretending that those are the only real DC canon. 🙂

And I read the first Dresden novel, didn’t like the character enough to read a second. Same with Anita Blake, really. I’m sure they have their fans, but I’m never going to be one of them. Not much more to say than that, really. 🙂

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mygif

@Tom: No parting shot intended. I’m sorry. Peace?

@John Seavey: Thanks for mentioning Anita Blake. After remembering how strong my irrational hatred of that series is, it forced me to admit that I’ve been more strident than I should have been in my “defense” of The Dresden Files.

I’m not as familiar as I should be with the good Silver Age Hawkman stuff.

There are things about that version of the character that strike me as being too darn whimsical. Like… why would Thanagar even need cops if Byth was their first criminal? And why would an alien civilization decide that their police needed to dress like the Hawkmen from old Flash Gordon serials?

I suspect the genius lies in the execution. An attempt to write a Silver Age homage in an anthology from a few years back mostly just made me yearn for the Hawkworld version. But I can see how a better writer could make the Fifties version work.

All I know is that just about anything seems better to me than the original Golden Age version. “I think I’m a reincarnated Egyptian prince and I go around killing criminals with my collection of priceless antique weapons” doesn’t work for me as a premise.

On the one hand it’s kind of cool that this Indiana Jones-type adventurer was able to invent working wings and discover how to use Nth metal. But on the other hand… why not just use a gun instead of risking damage to the weapons he collected? For that matter, why not use battle ready replicas instead of expecting us to accept that his antiques are unusually well-preserved? And how fast could he fly anyway? Maybe 90 miles per hour?

The more I think about the original version, the more I wonder why some bank robber didn’t just shoot him. He’s one of those characters who doesn’t really have much going for him other than a good look.

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mygif

Rebooting Hawkman is like playing Jenga with an infinite tower: no matter what you do, something is going to break, and the guy who comes after you isn’t gonna be helpful.

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