Related Articles

34 users responded in this post

Subscribe to this post comment rss or trackback url
mygif

It’s also absurd to think of Hoffman in “The Master” and Waltz in “Django” as “supporting actors”. Both are easily onscreen enough to be in the lead actor category.

ReplyReply
mygif
The Unstoppable Gravy Express said on January 10th, 2013 at 11:00 am

I’d raise the Best Picture Crashie rating for leaving out Moonrise Kingdom.

Thank you for calling out Life of Pi.

Looks like Lincoln is going to be the thing that wins all the things, instead of Les Mis, as you originally predicted. Haven’t seen Lincoln so I don’t know if that’s an improvement.

Re: Supporting Actor, I’ve seen lots of comments elsewhere saying “hey where’s Leo DiCaprio?” but I agree with you, Sam Jackson is the real snub.

ReplyReply
mygif

Looks like Lincoln is going to be the thing that wins all the things, instead of Les Mis, as you originally predicted. Haven’t seen Lincoln so I don’t know if that’s an improvement.

It’s a vast improvement if it happens because Lincoln is an excellent movie all around whereas Les Mis is reasonably okay, but it’s not like Spielberg doesn’t have experience with crashing and burning re: lots of Oscar noms before.

ReplyReply
mygif
The Unstoppable Gravy Express said on January 10th, 2013 at 11:10 am

it’s not like Spielberg doesn’t have experience with crashing and burning re: lots of Oscar noms before.

Even when he has the MOST noms though? (Maybe yes, haven’t checked.) And since 2nd most noms is Life of Pi, and given the Best Director snubs, it’s looking like I’ll be rooting for Lincoln…

ReplyReply
mygif

Even when he has the MOST noms though?

The Color Purple is famous for this. Saving Private Ryan won Spielberg his second Best Director statue but otherwise crashed and burned in the “big” categories. Et cetera.

ReplyReply
mygif

Does anyone really take the ‘we do ten for Best Picture now’ thing seriously without there also being ten slots for Best Director?

Having said that, we may get another type mismatch this year, but I find it far more likely Lincoln simply wins both.

Although given how crazy the Academy can be, I wouldn’t count out life of Pi.

ReplyReply
mygif
The Unstoppable Gravy Express said on January 10th, 2013 at 11:33 am

The Color Purple is famous for this. Saving Private Ryan won Spielberg his second Best Director statue but otherwise crashed and burned in the “big” categories. Et cetera.

Oh.

ReplyReply
mygif

Man, I adore Christoph Waltz– with an adoration that may be unhealthy, even– but him over Sam Jackson? No.

Was further proof that the Academy clearly smokes crack really needed?

ReplyReply
mygif

Beasts of the Southern Wild was one of those movies I was curious about this year, but never got around to seeing. Most of the stuff I’ve heard is positive, though. I totally agree about Life of Pi, though.

Anyone want to elaborate on what makes BotSW gimmicky?

ReplyReply
mygif
Mitchell Hundred said on January 10th, 2013 at 12:40 pm

As expected, we disagree about Beasts of the Southern Wild and Life of Pi. They were both quite beautiful in my opinion. I do agree that Lincoln would be a better choice for Best Picture (although as yet unconfirmed reports seem to indicate that Zero Dark Thirty may be even better) than Les Miz. Really, though, I’d be fine with most of these choices winning, as the ones I’ve seen are either good or excellent movies and the ones I haven’t are by all accounts quite well-made. I’m mostly relieved that The Master didn’t get a nomination for Picture/Director/Screenplay, since all of those aspects of it were lousy (the acting nods are alright).

ReplyReply
mygif
The Unstoppable Gravy Express said on January 10th, 2013 at 12:48 pm

Life of Pi is indeed beautiful to look at, but to my mind, suffers from a meandering story that mostly didn’t happen, and an ultimate message of “if you must choose between facing hard truths and indulging in absurdist fantasies, the ethical and heroic choice is the latter”.

ReplyReply
mygif

While I am normally sad at under-representation of excellent animation in nominations like this, I can’t feel too bad at the lack of Brave – it wasn’t a bad film, by any means, but didn’t have that special spark that really infuses the best of the Pixar films.

Honestly, Wreck-It Ralph is the movie this year that really displayed that sort of heart, to me, and so is easily the one I am rooting for in the Animated Film category.

ReplyReply
mygif

If Wreck-It Ralph doesn’t win Best Animated it will be a goddamn travesty.

Wasn’t MGK going to write about that at some point?

ReplyReply
mygif

“Life of Pi is indeed beautiful to look at, but to my mind, suffers from a meandering story that mostly didn’t happen, and an ultimate message of ‘if you must choose between facing hard truths and indulging in absurdist fantasies, the ethical and heroic choice is the latter’.”

Really? I’m not surprised at some of the antipathy towards Life of Pi–it definitely earned its criticisms–but I can’t help but feel that much of its point is precisely to argue against an epistemology that dictates that what is more believable is inherently more true. There’s literally no reason to believe the second narrative–aside from it being introduced with the revealing question of “Do you want a story you can believe?” “We want the truth,” it’s shot as a graceless perfunctory talking head, and it’s a collection of travel narrative stereotypes. It only has the weight of truth because it appeals to long-standing beliefs of what such a narrative should sound like, as opposed to the meandering, confusing, wonderful tale the film actually reveals.

I would note as well that Martel and Lee, while perhaps idealistic at points, are both very concerned with the metafictional elements of the story–since neither version ‘really’ happened, what on Earth is the point of believing the uninteresting, cliched version of the tale? An appeal to realism or ‘hard truths’ hardly seems to hold weight under these standards.

ReplyReply
mygif

Exactly. Look at Baron Munchasen.

ReplyReply
mygif

Something I didn’t know until Scalzi mentioned it:

Everybody nominated for Best Supporting Actor already has an Oscar. De Niro has TWO Oscars.

I’ve decided to kind of root for Christoph Waltz or Hoffman, on the grounds that those two should be in all of the movies.

ReplyReply
mygif

My biggest pissed off vote is that Skyfall could have been the tenth Best Picture nomination but was snubbed. The good news is that Skyfall did get Best Cinematography and deserves to win it (the scenes in Shanghai, Macau, and the finale with the burning mansion are just visual feasts). I’m just afeared that the Best Song for Skyfall is gonna miss (Bond songs have been nominated but never won an Oscar) to whichever Les Mis song is up for consideration, because that’s gonna be another freaking Titanic-ish juggernaut movie and Hollywood just freaking loves musicals (headdesk).
I *do* think Mark Ruffalo should have been nominated for Bruce Banner in the Avengers movie: his was a well-acted smooth take on the haunted scientist with anger issues.

ReplyReply
mygif
Tim O'Neil said on January 11th, 2013 at 12:54 am

Whatever the token “new” Les Miz song is, the fact is that Adele is nominated, and Adele gets all the awards, always. This is a fact of nature, whether we like it or not.

Plus, where’s Leonardo DiCaprio? Never thought I’d be saying this for him, but come on, people.

ReplyReply
mygif

I don’t think Les Mis can take song, since it’s not original for the movie?

Also: Paranorman made it in! Paranorman is really, REALLY good you guys

ReplyReply
mygif
Tim O'Neil said on January 11th, 2013 at 5:03 am

They wrote a new song for Les Mis, seemingly for the sole purpose of getting a Best Song Oscar.

ReplyReply
mygif
The Unstoppable Gravy Express said on January 11th, 2013 at 8:46 am

@Luc:

If Martel’s point was to argue that “believable doesn’t equal true”, then he shouldn’t have included solid evidence (within the novel’s world) that one tale was true and the other not. The movie mentions things like “bananas don’t float” and there being no record of the giant storm (only a mild disturbance), and in the book there’s corroborating testimony towards the “realistic” story.

I’m all for stories that celebrate the power of storytelling and triumphs of the imagination and idealism and the like. But Baron Munchausen isn’t a “real” character, he’s a mythic representation. What’s at stake is really Sarah Polley’s ability to hope and dream and etc. So the Martel ending to Baron Munchausen would be something like “well actually, Sarah got raped and murdered and torn apart by wild animals. But let’s pretend that never happened!! Yay for us!!”

ReplyReply
mygif

Tim, never underestimate the Oscars giving the Best Song award to the wrong song.

Evidence: the theme to Norma Rae beating out “The Rainbow Connection.” The theme to “Beauty and the Beast” beating out an even better song from the movie “Be Our Guest”. A mopey love song from Lion King beating out the stirring “Circle Of Life.” And for Bond themes, no wins ever which is shocking considering a huge number of them – “Goldfinger,” “Diamonds Are Forever,” “Live and Let Die,” “Nobody Does it Better,” “For Your Eyes Only,” “A View To a Kill,” “The World Is Not Enough,” and “You Know My Name” would have won in a sane world…

ReplyReply
mygif

I’m not sure what corroborating evidence you see here. The “bananas don’t float” line is disproven in the book, but even in the movie the characters agree that bananas float–the whole point is that the character brings up the line about “bananas don’t float” not because it’s true, but because it SOUNDS true. In turn, the “realistic” story stands as warning of the dangers of the world you create when you automatically conflate those two–a warning that, judging by audience reaction to the book/film, some people could sorely need.

I don’t think it’s just about the power of imagination, except in as much as it concerns able to imagine possible truths outside of the field of your own experience. The more appropriate analogy would be if, at the end of Baron Munchausen, a very sincere character with no knowledge of the events in question tried to argue that none of his story could have happened on the grounds that he–and the corporate interests he represent–don’t believe it.

ReplyReply
mygif

Really, Paul? Diamonds Are Forever? I mean, I’ll debate some of the others, but that one?

ReplyReply
mygif
Potomac Ripper said on January 11th, 2013 at 2:53 pm

Hathaway has earned the statue. No performance in any movie last year grabbed me as hers did.

ReplyReply
mygif

Of course, the things that make Jackson’s performance and the character of Stephen in Django Unchained so troubling and compelling are precisely what prevented him from scoring the nod he deserved. Especially as much of the racial criticism of the movie revolves around that character (and it’s a subject on which reasonable people can differ), so the Academy doesn’t want to bother because they don’t like being controversial.

ReplyReply
mygif

Diamonds Are Forever, awesome bass riff.

ReplyReply
mygif

I’m with Luc–I didn’t read Life of Pi (which I agree is hardly a masterpiece) as being a celebration of lying as so many are interpreting it. It struck me as just as likely that a lot of the stuff Pi talks about happened to him–if you can’t buy into the fantastical nature of some of it, credit it partly to hallucinations and ocean madness–and that he felt the need to concoct a “true” story when he realize how crazy it all sounded. I don’t think it’s a coincidence that the supposedly “true” story isn’t depicted as anything other than Pi talking, and that it’s immediately followed by the journalist saying “Aha! So the tiger represented X!” which is a bang-on representation of how some people want to read all fiction, let alone myths and parables. In fact, I’d argue that’s exactly what a lot of its critics are doing to the movie itself.

More to the point, there was just too much heartfelt detail in the Richard Parker story for me to believe that it all came out of Pi’s head. I think this movie is akin to The Usual Suspects–some of the supposed “lie” is true, but we can’t know exactly how much.

Of course, I never read the book, maybe it completely shoots down this theory. But I think Lee very deliberately left room for multiple interpretations, and people are siding with Pi’s second story as “true” just because of the context.

ReplyReply
mygif

As for the animated category, I’m delighted by it, even though Brave (which was just OK) is probably going to win by default. But seeing The Pirates! and Paranorman on there warms my heart. (Paranorman would be my personal pick to win, but I wouldn’t be overly outraged by any of them winning.) And hey, how cool is it that three of the five nominees are stop-motion?

ReplyReply
mygif
Tim O'Neil said on January 12th, 2013 at 1:40 am

I wasn’t trying to argue that Adele’s song was the better song. As with most Bond songs, it’s terrible. Most songs ever up for “best song” are terrible as a law of nature. The point is that, if Adele is up for an award, she will get that award.

It’s her world, we just live in it.

ReplyReply
mygif

Adele gets all the awards?

Next up: for the Nobel Prize in Chemistry… ADELE!

Adele shows up at a suburban soccer tournament and receives the MVP trophy…

Any others she can win? :)

ReplyReply
mygif

I think “Adele, WWE Heavyweight Champion” has a nice ring to it.

ReplyReply
mygif

Seriously Brave wasn’t even the best animated movie this year.

ReplyReply
mygif
Chris Russell said on January 15th, 2013 at 11:36 pm

I don’t usually find myself in this position, but having seen all of the “Best Supporting” performances, I’m calling it a crime if Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Adams don’t win. They were in BY FAR the crappiest movie of the bunch and made it reasonably compelling thanks solely to their sheer presence and skill.

ReplyReply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Please Note: Comment moderation may be active so there is no need to resubmit your comments