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mygif

A few thoughts: I’d actually say Conan does belong in comics, which will probably get me lynched by Conan fans but frankly, I don’t think he became a fully-realized character until Frazetta drew him, and then Windsor-Smith and Buscema layered their own interpretations on him. So much of Conan comes from that look, the sullen, brooding intensity that Frazetta gave him on those old paperback covers…it’s like he was there, but he wasn’t complete until you saw that. (You may commence the lynching.)

What makes the Thing work is Stan Lee’s dialogue. It absolutely drips personality. Over the first 102 issues of that series, he went from being a generic anti-hero to being “the ever-lovin’ blue-eyed idol o’ millions.” You could strip the art out of an FF comic–hell, you could strip the art out of a comic book, period, and you would know when Ben Grimm was talking. Now that’s character.

Love the love for Hawkeye, one of my all-time favorite characters. He’s someone who’s managed to mature without becoming dull, which is an amazing triumph; part of that, I think, is because he’s a character who’s cocky because he’s good. He fought another archer (Imus Champion) who tried to shoot a bomb Hawkeye was standing next to from the limit of his ability to hit a target at range…Hawkeye shot the guy’s bowstring out from under him. Triumphantly bad-ass moment. :)

Professor X really didn’t “start out” moralistic so much as Claremont wrote him that way, and everyone starts reading X-Men with Claremont; the original Lee/Kirby Xavier was always a cold-hearted pragmatist with a ruthless streak a mile wide. This is a man who, back before he had a Danger Room, tested his X-Men by having them throw bowling balls at each others’ heads when they weren’t looking. That’s not the mark of a noble spirit. :)

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I’ll throw in a few scattered thoughts….

Wolverine at the top of the list bothers me immensely; the X-men at their best have always been a plot over character, idea over logic type of group. Even though I’m a gigantic Gambit fanboy, I’d say that Emma Frost circa-Morrison is one of the few current X-men to actually have a compelling personal narrative and be written half-decently.

Honestly, the Batman versus Superman versus Spider-man debate is one of semantics and bores me silly.

Wizard does get massive kudos for putting Tara Chace from Rucka’s Q&C at #51; she is far and away the best female character I’ve ever seen potrayed in the medium. How the hell do you forget Kate from Manhunter though?

Maybe it’s just me, but I’ve never seen the pathos and cult of personality over The Joker. He’s crazy. Haha. I get it, let’s move on. In terms of pure character potential Harvey Dent remains the biggest untapped character in the DCU and it’s a damned shame that Robinson ruined him during his terrible OYL clusterfuck of a Batman story.

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mygif

While we’re on the same page with Wolverine (top 20, ok, but NUMBAH ONE? Nah) and Wonder Woman (talk about your token inserts), not to mention the GI Joe characters. Considering how many f’ing x-Men there are, you’d think someone who is not “angry stabber” or “bald cripple” would show up. I get not using Cyclops, or Colossus, or Storm, but Kitty Pryde being the only other X-Man? It’s not like popularity was their standard (Magneto excluded on villainy).

And holy hell do I second Jessica Jones not belonging on part 1 of this list (if at all) and Hal Jordan? Where’s Rop Lot Fan? Come on, where’s my Mogo? Talk about unique characters – he’s a fucking planet with super powers.

That said, I feel like while Black Adam does feel very similar to Namor – he’s still a fascinating character and Tomasai did great things with him in his recent mini. And that Iron Man written by Orson Scott Card is pretty good, but Iron Man written by Matt Fraction is off the charts awesome.

Overall – total disappointment in this list, and that’s just from the top 50.

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mygif

Yeah, they lost me right out of the gate with wolvie. Nothing says “I’m a raving famboy living in my parent’s basement at 35.” like placing Wolverine ahead of Superman, Spiderman & Batman.

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These entries are fingerprints as to where and when these editors entered the comics fandom. I’m thinking that if they submerged in the medium in the mid-late ’80s, then yes, Wolverine is going to be nigh-implacable as your iconic hero of four-color narrative. (Ditto the prominence of the Watchmen characters.) I can’t take them seriously as a ratings system — I don’t see how they’re of any use beyond their own personal event horizons except as grist for the mill — and find them more enlightening about the people who compiled the list than about the characters or their inherent value or contributions to the medium.

and I haven’t found a download yet

…We should talk.

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mygif

Two comments:
#1:
The Goblin is honestly just a garden-variety psychopath with a silly costume and a lot of power; there’s never been anything special about the Goblin himself.

Don’t forget, this is Wizard. Who is The Green Goblin, according to the majority of the world? He’s Willem Dafoe chewing scenery madly through *three* films despite dying in the first one.

And at the end of 2, I was genuinely excited to see Harry’s fate in 3. Then I saw 3, and wanted to bleach my brain.

But that’s not the point. The point is that the Goblin they’re thinking of is the *cool* Goblin.

#2: On Conan
It seems kind of weird including a character whose origin lies in other media in this sort of list.

Conan, like Remo Williams, was always a comic-book character. He just happened to be in novels.

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Wizard’s writers are asshats. Wolverine getting placed at #1 proves it.

Oh, and as far as Silver Surfer goes — have you read Silver Surfer: Requiem? While it doesn’t really have the length necessary to give the Surfer a real personality, it’s a damn good story nonetheless, and the art is amazing (in my opinion).

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karellan said on June 2nd, 2008 at 11:40 am

Green Goblin would have been forgotten if he wasn’t the one who killed Gwen Stacy. His “death” right after also helped cement him in comics history. The Gwen Stacy thing was really the only memorable moment the character ever had. I agree, Doc Ock was always much more interesting.

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The problem with The Joker is that he’s supposed to be this walking personification of personal, human horror and hence, moreso than any other character, everybody’s going to have their own Joker. The concept is very solid (a man who reduces all life to a meaningless laugh), and it’s worked well with other characters (like The Comedian, for example), but the idea of the Joker sounds so good when you hear it that, you’re expectations are automatically set higher than the writing can match. Maybe it’s that the character’s been overhyped, maybe we just expect too much from the man Batman supposedly fears, but The Joker will never manage to top his own PR.

That said, The Laughing Fish should probably be recognized as one of the greatest ideas in comicdom, even if the execution itself in hardly legendary. That story is the perfect example of what the Joker should be.

I like Thor immensely, but that’s because I’m giant mythology buff and I grew up on The Oxford Book of Myths For Children. Volume 2 was pretty good for the first two years or so in a “fun, punch-up but with a little bit of moral complexity” kind of way, and JMS has been doing really good work with Volume 3. I don’t think Thor has ever really met his potential, although the new stuff is finally coming close. He may be, ironically enough, the closest thing Marvel may have to Sandman — a character who is at once larger-than-life and frail-as-man and through whom we see the interactions of the sublime and the mortal. And he gets the best damn sound effects ever.

THRAKKKKAAAA-DOOOOM!

Miracleman should most definitely be on that list, although I don’t know at what ranking. Honestly, I wouldn’t use MM himself, but his villainous counter-part, Bates.

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Milkman Dan said on June 2nd, 2008 at 12:03 pm

Here is a Miracleman download.

http://rs.4chan.org/?s=miracleman

And a more convenient (IMHO) torrent.

http://www.h33t.com/details.php?id=7c07a9a84a1d9f476a25590953408287f603b061

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mygif

Yeah, I have to agree that Conan has always been a natural fit with comics, even if he didn’t originate there; I think if we referred to Tarzan or The Shadow as “comic book characters” no one would blink, even though they’re in the same boat, so I’d say the same for Conan. And I’m not sure there *have* been more Star Wars comics than Conan ones, have there?

This is a neat idea for a series of articles, even if it just comes back to “Wizard sucks” over and over again. But by commenting on their entries, you’re actually giving it a real purpose! Huzzah!

Oh, by the way…I’d like to understand your logic for “without Superman, there’s no comics post-mid-40s”. I don’t think I agree with that, especially given the fact that the comics-reading public seemed to lose interest in superheroes right about that time. I guess you could argue that without Supes, ADVENTURE comics might not have made it post-Comics Code, since superheroes were one of the few action concepts you could do under their rules…but then, the rules were largely shaped by the superhero comics publishers anyway, so without Superman there wouldn’t have been a DC to drive EC out of business.

Sorry…still bitter.

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I pretty much agree with almost all of what you said in this, but want to throw out that Ellis has been doing some fantastic character work with Norman Osbourne over in Thunderbolts. Once Thunderbolts gets cancelled/rebooted all of that will almost certainly get thrown out, but right now Ellis has succeeded in making Osbourne an actually interesting compelling character. Top 30 characters of all time interesting? No, not really. But he has given him some substance and fleshed out the 2d “Hates spiderman and is nuts” character sketch into a believable (and funny) monomaniac.

The thing about lists like this (this one excepted as its pish) is that if they are honest then they arent actually interesting. Basically because there are precious few undiscovered gems in comics. Most of the best characters are damn obvious, so 90% of the entries on (an honest) list would be prefaced with “An obvious choice but…”, eg Jack Knight. Everyone knows that he is a fleshed out interesting character, so its not interesting to point out that he is.

As an aside, Superman wouldnt feature on any list of well developed interesting characters I made. INFLUENTIAL characters of all time, certainly. But hes far better as an icon than as a character. Much like wonderwoman really.

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I really really really want to write a defence of Wolverine right now. Because although he’s not my favourite character, as such, and I can’t honestly disagree with those who say he’s overexposed, I still love him dearly, and I think there’s a lot more to him than you’re allowing here. But someone else’s comments field is not the best place for this kind of exercise, so I shall refrain.

I’m a bit stunned that Yorick Brown makes the top 50 and Agent 355 doesn’t. That looks to me like the choice of someone who hasn’t actually read Y: The Last Man.

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mygif

Mark Waid’s note on Reed in his F4 manifesto, comparing Reed to a slightly more civilized and polite version of Doc Savage, is excellent reading in its own right, incidentally.

do you have a link? i’d love to read that, i love reed :)

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7. Captain America

Cap’s a surprisingly complex fellow. He should rank highly.

It’s interesting how differently people view him; I completely agree with you, which was why I was boggled when Kalinara recently was all gungho for a wrestler to play Cap, because he wasn’t a complicated character like Iron Man or the Hulk and didn’t need an actor to play!

9. Magneto

He hasn’t been written well in forever, though.

Partially because he was a far more interesting character when he was reforming, or at least genuinely torn, and bouncing him back and forth between villain and reforming really doesn’t work after the first cycle or two.

11. The Thing

Ben Grimm probably would have to be somewhere in the top twenty if only for his relatively inexplicable and lasting appeal to every comic fan ever born. I think it was Mark Waid who said that the Thing is one of the simplest, least complicated characters in comics, and that this is precisely why he’s so beloved and works so well.

The problem is thinking of interesting things to do with him. They have pretty much done the whole “wanting to be human again” thing to death, to the point where it’s tacitly or openly acknowledged that he’s a big rocky guy because he wants to be.

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mygif

It’s odd, now I come to think of it, but despite being a hardcore X-Men fanboy I’m having trouble thinking of a good argument for any of the characters I love to be on that list. Wolverine… what everyone else said. Top twenty, at best. I personally don’t get the appeal of Kitty Pryde. Magneto, thanks to Chris Claremont, was for a time probably the most compelling and well-characterised villain out there.

By the same token, although I think Hitman is the best thing Ennis has ever done, I really can’t argue for Tommy, Natt or Tiegel going ahead of Cassidy or the Punisher.

Oh, and this list is totally American. I’m sure there’s some hugely popular and influential Japanese comic-book characters out there (who’s this Akira guy I keep hearing about?) and, as a Brit, I’m irritated at the complete absence of Judge Dredd.

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Prankster: Comic publishing as a whole was definitely languishing before Superman, and the vast assortment of superheroes that followed, rejuvenated the industry and allowed for other forms of comics (crime comics, horror comics, romance comics, et cetera) to find their profitability niche as publishers would experiment with subject matter while letting the capes and tights finance their experimentation. It’s not unfair at all to suggest the possibility that without Superman, no capes and tights to finance the other genres’ startup costs, and thus no comics as the medium collapsed.

Pat!: Waid’s manifesto isn’t available online so far as I know, but the entire thing – what he wrote to get the job on F4 – is reprinted in the first Waid/’Ringo F4 hardcover.

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mygif

Wizard taking their long-time coverboy and giving him the top spot in an ALL-TIME GREATEST CHARACTERS list? Who’da thought? Anybody could’ve called that one.

I agree with you on the Goblin. Tossing an unconscious girl off a bridge was the only memorable thing he ever did. This moment–and his subsequent death by his own glider–had more of an impact than anything he ever did beforehand. He should’ve never been brought back from the dead.

And as a G.I. Joe fan, he do agree with you on both SnakeEyes and Cobra Commander. Even though I liked SS, his overexposure nearly killed the comic (remember those wonderful days when the book was called “SNAKE-EYES…featuring G.I.Joe”) and while Larry Hama did a good job making CC a better villian and giving him some depth (at least more death than the cartoon), it’s not enough to merit putting him on a list like this.

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Heksefatter said on June 2nd, 2008 at 1:47 pm

Where is Rex the Wonder Dog?

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By the way, MGK: Before you continue on with the other parts of Wizard’s flawed G.O.A.T. list, are there any INEXCUSABLE EXCLUSIONS from the list that you want to bring up?

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mygif

After reading the rest of the list I have to say that the whole thing feels like the Wizard staff just got together over beers and wrote down all the “cool” characters they thought of, in order. Then wrote little blurbs justifying their place on the list.

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mygif

I’ll second the complaints at the absence of Dredd; if Marvelman (sorry, Miracleman) qualifies, then Dredd should too.

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mygif

no real cause to disagree with anything you’ve said here, save one thing.

Wolvie’s favorite beer is Dos Equis. He drinks shitty mexican beer and smokes cheap cigars cause he can get away with it. Also, the artists probably like the two “X”s on the package.

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CandidGamera said on June 2nd, 2008 at 2:46 pm

Lobo and Deadpool make the top 200, but not Ambush Bug? Shenanigans!

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Lister Sage said on June 2nd, 2008 at 3:31 pm

CandidGamera: While I can’t speak for Lobo, if ANYONE deserves to be on this list it’s Wade. Deadpool went from a one note, Deathstroke rip-off to a man fighting for redeption under Kelly, fighting for respect with Simone and to become a hero under Nicieza and he did it with a kick to the face and a joke on his lips. Deadpool is the sole reason I started reading Marvel again. And I damn near wept when Cable and Deadpool was cencelled. He’s gone on a true hero’s journey and that alone is why he’s now my favorite comic book character and why he’s won the undying support of hundreds, if not thousands, of comic book fans. Though I get the feeling that Daniel Way is going to sorely test those limits.

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Brendan said on June 2nd, 2008 at 3:31 pm

Hmmm I don’t see Kurt Wagner yet. Nah I’m being biased. Nightcrawler will always be my boy

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Clayton said on June 2nd, 2008 at 3:32 pm

I have to say that the list lost all credibility with me when I noticed the conspicuous absence of Molly f’ing Hayes.

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CandidGamera said on June 2nd, 2008 at 4:38 pm

Lister : Deadpool is the bastard child of Deathstroke and Ambush Bug. Ambush Bug is the definitive fourth-wall-breaker.

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MGK: Fair enough, though we’re getting into “what might have been” territory here. Given their history as a cheap “filler” medium (for instance, Marvel comics surviving to the 60s primarily because a larger publishing company needed material to keep their presses rolling 24 hours a day) and the popularity of newspaper comics of the time, I tend to think that they would have limped along long enough to find something else if superheroes hadn’t burst onto the scene…but obviously I’m speculating here.

I tend to be a big defender of the idea that there’s more to the medium than superheroes, and that people who chart comic history tend to focus on them a little too much (so you can imagine my problems with this list, and Wizard in general). So I guess I’m a bit of a contrarian on these matters.

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Sofa King said on June 2nd, 2008 at 5:01 pm

Aquaman, dammit!…ok, I tried.

I might have thrown Kyle on there instead of Hal, but I am biased.

And I agree, Thunderbolts Osborn is actually scary. The Joker I never liked, though.

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Aulayan said on June 2nd, 2008 at 5:01 pm

I must disagree with your assessment on Black Adam. The stuff in JSA featuring him has managed to turn me into a Black Adam fan, and I usually dislike anti-heroes. He felt…fleshed out to me in that run, and damn interesting.

Most of your other assessments I do agree with however.

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mygif

Although I found your commentary really interesting, I’ve never read any comics besides like 10 issues of godzilla. (OH YEAH GODZILLA)

However, from my poor memory, I recall Venom being rediculously badass. Where is he? I don’t know about his human character, and I don’t really care that much, but at least based on the Ultimate Spider Man video game that came out a few years ago (the comic book animation one), he owns joker and goblin and whatnot.

Please don’t kill me for saying that. It’s probably my super-limited knowledge speaking. I totally recommend that game, BTW. You can tear people the fuck in HALF! OR EAT THEM! YOU CAN THROW A HUMMER AT A CHOPPER, for chrissake.

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motteditor said on June 2nd, 2008 at 6:31 pm

TBolts’ Osborne does nothing for me. Just another nutjob, and I’ll be thrilled when he’s back out of the book and it goes back to be about villains seeking redemption, instead of just about villains.

Much surprised to see Hawkeye there, but very happy. Even happier that they call him Hawkeye and don’t acknowledge this ninja idiocy Bendis has going on with him. It’s like he missed the entire point of why he became Goliath in the first place — so he’d be more useful to his team. Making him the worst hand-to-hand combatant on his own team (instead of the foremost archer in the world) is the exact opposite of what makes sense for the character. Of course, so does offing himself because his quiver was on fire.

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dom:

Venom is no longer Venom. New Venom isn’t as awesome as Old Venom, but still has all the calories, so it’s just not worth it. Anti-Venom is an interesting marketing approach, but I’m sure it will go the same way as Mountain Dew Supernova.

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mygif

You laugh, but Cobra Commander should be in the top fifty, possibly higher than he is. There is a lot of symbolism and intentional projection in the character, which is why I prefer the mirror mask to the hood: You look that fucker in the eye and see YOURSELF staring back at you and RIGHTLY SO.

He’s tarnished by an origin story tailored to make Snake Eyes that much more tragic (and Snake Eyes does have some excellent moments: his letter on war is partially sermonizing by Larry Hama, but it’s still pretty good), but Cobra Commander’s basic character concept pulls off “One Bad Day*” better than any Joker story ever did, and is so pure and blissful it’s almost elemental.

A used car salesman, about as ordinary and lowly as a U.S. citizen can get, suffers a really horrific tragedy, has a psychotic break, and goes on to build the best-trained, best-equipped and most comprehensive terrorist network on the planet. Cobra Commander is the ultimate perversion of the American Dream, which is really what he’s supposed to be. Below all the byzantine soap-opera drama in the Cobra High Command, beyond all the stuff with Snake-Eyes’ little sister and Cobra Commander’s brother and and and, is that concept:

You can achieve anything if you really want it badly enough. Even if what you want to do make the entire world suffer.

*”One bad day to turn an ordinary man into a complete psychopath, Some men just want to watch the world burn, etc.”

Re: Wolverine; this is a Wizard list, of course Wolverine is #1. And Conan was and is a literary character, but the Conan comics from the 70s/80s were really spectacular fantasy stuff, and the character translates so well to the comic book medium (which is appropriate, since Comic Books go hand in hand with the magz that Howard published the Conan stories in originally) that it really is a genuine perfect fit.

Also, Conan is awesome.

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Andrew W. said on June 2nd, 2008 at 7:57 pm

Marv’s probably the most painless Sin City character to put onto the list. He’s the penultimate male self-insert revenge fantasy character.

The thing that made it easier to accept Bucky was, at the time, I think folks weren’t threatened by Bucky’s return displacing a decent character. I could be wrong, but I don’t think at the time Brubaker brought Bucky back anyone was really aware that it would mean we’d lose Steve Rogers in the bargain, which sorta seems like the probably with bringing back that other Flash guy no one cares about except Silver Age enthusiasts with massive hard-ons for the halcyon past that never really existed on the printed page.

We had to go through a lot of shit to get to Ennis Punisher, and Ennis Punisher running over superheroes with a steamroller like a fucking Looney Tune should be enough to take the fucker off the list.

I want to say that the Watchmen and Preacher characters get too much hype, but . . . I can’t really be sure it’s not just my bias. I slogged through all of Preacher in one afternoon and evening, and same with Watchmen, and I just . . . can’t see the heart. I can accept Watchmen being on the list because, hey, back in the ’80s, it was all new and visionary (sort of like how James Joyce is regarded as an important author), but . . . fuck if I can enjoy that.

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bad wolf said on June 2nd, 2008 at 10:34 pm

No Brainiac 5? I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: F@#% Wizard.

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I don’t really mind Wolverine being in the top of the list. People fucking love him for a reason, though there hasn’t been a decent Wolverine story in a long while.

I totally agree with you about Cassidy being a better character than Jesse Custer. His arc–all of the alcoholic, lying, cheating, murdering ways–is the real redemption in Preacher.

Y’know who belongs on this list? Amanda Waller.

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Dan Brown said on June 2nd, 2008 at 10:58 pm

“Dr. Octopus is the Spider-Man villain with resonance. ”

Elaborate, por favor. I’m interested.

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Even though I know in my heart Wizard sucks, their shitty list still ofends me.

I am okay with Conan being on the list because unlike Star Wars or Predator, the comics predate the movies. Howard wrote his stories, Camp rewrote them into a mess and then Roy Thomas adapted Conan into comic book success. The comic character of Conan is his own entity that people recognize even moved to another company. You could argue that the Dark Horse Conan series was less about adopting Howard’s version as much as it was merging Howard’s version with the comic version that’s been around for thirty years.

I think I have more of a problem seeing characters less then 15 years old in the top 50. I like Preacher and Y:The Last Man, but it is too early to say whether they have characters that can stand the test of time. On the other hand, Brainaic 5 has been around in one incarnation or another for what, 40 years?

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Zenrage said on June 3rd, 2008 at 9:36 am

There is no reason for any character from Y:The Dead Horse to be on that list. Just because they aren’t clad in spandex, doesn’t mean they’re not all one-trick ponies.

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I guess all that critical acclaim and praise the book got was for it being a non superhero comic – nevermind that those have been coming out for years.

Does Hundred make this list? Because it’ll be criminal if he doesn’t.

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Ken Raining said on June 3rd, 2008 at 11:00 am

As much as I generally dislike Wizard, their lists ramp my anger up to 11. Have you ever seen their list of the 100 best graphic novels ever? It promises “you won’t believe what’s number one!” What follows is a list of 99 superhero comics, topped by… MAUS. It’s such a token inclusion that I was angrier to see it on the list then I would have were it not included. And this is also the magazine that declared Hayden “my skin is orange” Panette the hottest women to EVER appear on television.

Any top 50 that doesn’t include Maggie, Hopey, Cerebus, Nexus or Usagi is shit.

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…Not to mention Luba! And I guess Finder is a bit obscure but I’d like to see Jaeger break the top 100. Also, no love for non-English comics? Asterix and Tintin trump Wolverine — not to mention shitty Image comics from the ’80s — any day.

But it sounds like a boring sort of list anyway, which is why most of the time I just forget that Wizard exists.

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Generic Lad said on June 3rd, 2008 at 12:05 pm

Not that I would expect it from Wizard, but Nexus (one of my all-time favorite series) gets no love at all – I’d put Horatio, Sundra, Dave, Judah and Kreed all in my top 25 character list.

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NY Johnny said on June 3rd, 2008 at 3:26 pm

If you are expecting a “funny” Joker, then really YOU are missing the point of the character (as originally inteneded). Thats what ya call yer basic irony….

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I thought Cobra Commander was a snake man from Cobra-La.

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Wait a minute. Wizard is still being published? Oh my God, something is seriously wrong with the world.

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Dude, there is so much good here. A lot of characterization nails hit on the head which more than I can say about the books that actually have said characters….

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The thing about WOnder Woman is if she wasn’t the first superheroine then who would be?

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[…] I got emails and comments in large numbers asking me for my take on this. God knows why. I mean,http://mightygodking.com/index.php/2008/06/02/mgk-versus-wizards-top-200-comics-characters-of-all-ti…Aimee Mann shines at House of Blues Fort Worth Star-TelegramBy PRESTON jones DALLAS ?? It??s […]

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Honestly, if Wizard made a list of the 100 greatest films of all time, it’d be topped by whatever the favorite fanboy movie of the past month is.

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“You presume I have no creed? My creed is Luthor.” Hmmm… Lexy ,Doom called he sues you for copyright
For wonder woman you forgot messner-loebs & phil jimenez ,he was far better than rucka (not bad until countdown to inf)
F”””” comics kitty pryde ,the evolution one was better,and Jubilee is a far better character
for the joker just look at the right direction my friend like
Detective Comics #726 (October 1998): “Fool’s Errand”
Detective Comics #826 “Slayride” Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight #65 – #68 (1994): “Going Sane” Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight #142 – #145 (2001): “The Demon Laughs” Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight #162 – #163 ( 2003): “Auteurism” Robin II #1 – #4 (1991): “The Joker’s Wild”Impulse #50 (July 1999): “First Fool’s”
Batman: It’s Joker Time! #1 – #3 (2000) (how could people miss this one is beyond me)
Joker: Devil’s Advocate (1997) and yes no disrespect to lexy (srsly i love supes & his rogues gallery dont get me wrong) but when well written …Mr JAY ALL THE WAY,BAYBAY!!
and Last time wolvie was interesting was when written by Rucka (srsly check out the entire run it’s how logan should act and Rucka’s Sabretooth is the definitive take on victor creed)
as for marv…yeah i like him but top 200?come on that’s pushing it!(hartigan was far more memorable
Magneto? dude his last good story as a villain was fatal attractions, Apocalypse, mr Sinister(srsly fuck Sublime,this is the real evil geneticist ,accepts no substitute bitch) are far more imaginative villains and whom simple philosophies can be interpretated in a thousand different ways
it’s just up to the imagination of the goddamn writers to make that work dammit.

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