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I actually liked a lot of the Goodkind books and still do.

He indeed is preachy, and I think everything goes downhill after his Faith of the Fallen.

The books after FotF were really disappointing, and I think he was tired of writing them at that point. His series ending was rushed and unsatisfying.

He also can be repetative, but I have a tendency to skim over the repetative parts (of any book).

I think it’s ultimately his characters that make me love the books (except for a few minor irrations like when Kalahn–a trained, feared, competent leader of many lands–becomes an airhead whenever Richard is around or is weak and not fearsome when it’s convenient to plot).

Goodkind made me care about even his secondary characters, so I was emotional when he killed them off.

He was also fairly inventive with some of the magic in his world (if not with plot), which is more than I can say for a lot of other books.

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Robert Jordan books I have also enjoyed. Although his female characters didn’t become complete airheads, he sure made them all bitchy and controlling (as if men NEVER are that way and women ALWAYS are).

I always hate how, even though the female and male power was suppose to be balanced, a male writer just can’t seem to help himself in making his male characters stronger in some way. Something I’ve noticed.

Brandon Sanderson has become the balance to some of the more aggravating aspects of Jordan, and likewise the other way around. I think they actually would have made great co-authors of other books, had Jordan not passed away.

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I don’t really care for GRRM books. I read a few of his, but his characters didn’t mean anything to me, so he could kill them off and I could care less.

“A Song of Rape and Whores” was someone’s take on ASoIaF. What is it with male fantasy/sci-fi writers and women, anyway?

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Covenant I read so long ago I can barely remember anything about it except I found it irritating and unenjoyable. I CERTAINLY didn’t care about the main character. Obviously, the book wasn’t even memorable.

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Dune never interested me, so I never read it. SO tried to get me to watch the movies/series of it, but those didn’t keep my attention either.

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Pern never interested me either, but my aunt loved them. I thought of them as boring.

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I think ultimately, it’s the characters that decide whether I like a book/series or not. Plots are so recycled (pretty much most plot ideas were used up a LONG time ago), that’s become secondary to me. Writing style is a third, unless is so clunky or over-elaborate that it gets in the way of the characters/story.

I like different kinds of heros. I like the Kushiel series because the main character was not what the typical hero is, and that right there drew me in.

I liked Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander series. LOVE her characters and her sense of humor. THAT series is mostly historical fiction with a dash of sci-fi/paranormal (not a whole lot) and a main romance (which is why it is often found in the romance section, even though I consider it more historical than anything). She has her aggravating habits, too, but mostly she is an awesome writer.

There’s actually not many series that I like. I’ll often buy the first book, but then abandon the rest of the series because it couldn’t hook me.

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David Edding’s books kept me from committing suicide, and for that I’ll always be grateful.

I guess the value of a book to someone depends on what you get out of it.

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chris buttner said on March 2nd, 2011 at 10:21 pm

I just read Lord Foul’s Bane. And then I saw this cover and laughed my ass off because in my 1st web search upon completion of this awful piece of crap I see exactly what the title should have been (add rapist in there too). Wow, this book is so bad on so many levels that its actually pretty fun to read. So blatantly ripping off everything Tolkien that calling it generic doesn’t begin to describe…Its like Donaldson went to college, smoked his 1st joint, got his 01st (and maybe last) piece of ass and she turned hom onto LOTR and he excreted this nonsense.

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EskimoDiabolist said on March 2nd, 2011 at 10:41 pm

All these years after reading Dune and then the next 2, I still refuse to believe they were written by the same person: Dune IS a masterpiece (I think), but the sequals I read were, as the French would say epouvantable!..Was it the second book where his kid wears a suit of desert trout and starts leaping around like the Hulk?

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[…] more hilarious fantasy book cover parodies, click here: Mighty God King.) Tagged: books, fantasy, raymond e […]

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Thanks, i really enjoyed the article. Eventhough it took ages to load. *stupid it megacable!*

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YOu forgot John Norman’s Gor series aka “I have serious issues with women.”

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[…] (A címet pofátlanul innen loptam.) […]

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for ASOIAF:

“Winter Is Probably Not Coming”

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“For some reason Asimov’s “Old Scientists are Sexy” and Heinlein’s “The Perfect Woman would be Me with Big Boobs” didn’t make the list, but otherwise, a cavalcade of memories.”

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sure, why not said on July 7th, 2011 at 11:15 pm

i’m more amused by the ‘philip pullman didn’t write an atheist series!’ comments than the original photoshops 😛

from snopes.com:
“…Pullman has left little doubt about his books’ intended thrust in discussions of his works, such as noting in a 2003 interview that “My books are about killing God” and in a 2001 interview that he was “trying to undermine the basis of Christian belief.”

dune is awesome, and how young are you that you got to read asoiaf in your adolescence? dang.

10 pts to gryffindor for ‘asshole leper hero’

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[…] can’t laugh enough about these posts by MGK: Read them. The Game of Thrones parody cover is not the funniest, but it is my pretext for promoting them once […]

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carnackiArdent said on October 30th, 2011 at 5:48 am

Let’s see… I enjoyed Eddings and Pullman, but I’ll freely admit that Eddings could get very repetitive (I think it really hit home the second time they got to the desert place with the ghosts). I still like Silk, though. And Pullman did get a little… heavy-handed as he went along, though not so much in the first one – I honestly missed that the Magisterium was working for the church in Golden Compass (yes, I’m American :P).

Only ever read the first few McCafferey books, never really got into them, especially since it was in middle school and the dragon mating stuff *still* made me uncomfortable. Likewise only read the first three Dune books because the third confused the hell out of me. Somehow avoided Anthony until I was old enough to know better.

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Definitely spot on about Eddings. I’ve only read the Belgariad, the Malloreon and the Elenium, but I’m surprised, however, that nobody mentions the trope that I spotted popping up so often in his work: The practice of creating a minor character with next to no plot importance who is simply so sympathetic, likeable or innocent that they exist simply to get killed horribly and unjustly in order to wring a cheap emotional reaction out of the reader. I can’t remember specific examples now, but I guarantee that you’ll notice it as you read them. I even remember Eddings himself commenting on the practice fairly early on in the Elenium by having Sparhawk remark that one of the knights in his little Fellowship is simply too nice not to get killed soon. My gaming group even used Eddings as a verb to describe introducing such a “Dead-NPC-Walking.”

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The Golden Compass and other books NEVER say that god doesn’t exsist, they just say that the person controlling heaven was not him. So it’s completely unreasonalbe that people don’t let their children read them, and by making such photoshop crap, you’re just adding to the contoversy.

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Bahahaha, now I really know I’m a fantasy nerd. Those are pretty hilarious.

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[…] and now Hollywood, by storm. I have mixed feelings about this. On the one hand, I love me some Knights Who Say “Fuck”, and I was reading stuff that was at least nearly as messed up as THE HUNGER GAMES by seventh grade […]

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[…] picture of the day! Many of these are great, but since it is picture of the day, I'll post this […]

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[…] Jostain peleistä kirjoitetaan jopa kirjoja. Se ei tosin tainnut olla tämän blogikirjoituksen pointti. mightygodkin.com […]

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I loved Piers Anthony from ages 9 to about 13, and although they still hold a place in my heart, I can’t seem to revisit the Xanth series. Probably because it’s just really not very good, and I know if I read it as an adult, my warm fuzzy nostalgic bubble will pop 🙁

The Incarnations of Immortality series isn’t bad, though. Some of the books, anyway. I think. Then again, I haven’t re-read them either so I’m probably remembering them better than they actually are.

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[…] Mightygodking dot com » Post Topic » MGK Versus His Adolescent Reading Habits. […]

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Nathan Myers said on October 21st, 2013 at 7:29 pm

Philip Pullman’s should be “Armored Bears! Then Some Other Stuff”.

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I feel like the Stainless Steel Rat series is just begging for this. I love them but damn the dialogue is stilted, and Jim is one of the biggest Marty Stus in existence, and his whole family takes after him that way.

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[…] Revisiting the sad, misogynistic fantasy of Xanth and as a chaser: MGK Versus His Adolescent Reading Habits […]

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InuNoTaisho said on October 29th, 2013 at 10:47 am

Oooooh! What a dweebish way to classify the Anne McCaffrey book! Honestly, I’m getting REALLY fed up with EVERY book that features a female protagonist being automatically slotted as “romantic fantasy” or “a Mary Sue story”. Talk about being sexist! Ask yourself this: Has there ever been a story about a guy who befriends a dragon, finds a beautiful woman, gets laid and saves the world? Is HE instantly labeled a “Gary Stu”??? No. How about “Tarnsman of Gor”? I read that one in high school too. As a female, it messed me up. Or how about ANY Conan the Barbarian book? Just because the male reading the book is incapable of putting himself in a female’s head for the length of the book does not make the story a “Mary Sue”. A true “Mary Sue” requires that the female lead meet an already established hero (Mr. Spock was the first recipient of that honor) entice him to choose her despite all obstacles, and then father the obligatory children with her. And how do I know about the “Mary Sue” trope? I’m old enough to have attended Star Trek cons in the early 70’s, and the person who originated the appellation “Mary Sue”, Paula Smith, is someone I’ve been on panels with at cons.

Instead of showing a distinct tendency to be out of touch with your “female side”, it is recommended that you have a better understanding of the labels you’re using. And to shove you into my shoes, remember this: women and girls are expected, as readers, to put themselves in both male and female lead roles in order to enjoy almost any book or movie. There is no reason at all that men can’t do it too. True men man up and try to see it from our point of view sometimes.

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[…] I had just birthed had been done before, several times, and probably by better-looking people with big muscles and cool […]

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[…] killing fans’ interest in the series. (Crossroads, in particular, is referred to jokingly as “Characters Show Up.”) Fortunately it picked up again with New Spring, a flashback novel focusing on a character who had […]

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Wheel of Time: SSDCI (Same Shit, Different Cover Illustration).

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Brilliant… Hysterical… I can’t wait for the next in the series 😉

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[…] (For more hilarious fantasy book cover parodies, click here: Mighty God King.) […]

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[…] There are tons of authors who let their characters swear, but my favorite offender here is the obvious one: George R.R. Martin. (In Jo Walton’s Tor essay she mentions a fan artist who made new covers for popular books. A Game of Thrones‘ new title was Knights Who Say Fuck.) […]

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[…] There are tons of authors who let their characters swear, but my favorite offender here is the obvious one: George R.R. Martin. (In Jo Walton’s Tor essay she mentions a fan artist who made new covers for popular books. A Game of Thrones‘ new title was Knights Who Say Fuck.) […]

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