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mygif

COIE is probably what cemented my lifelong love of comics. I was reading it as a 7-8 year old kid, as it came out.

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mygif

Neat.

So, who’s the hero in speedoes riding the giraffe? Because a giraffe-riding superhero is a bit of DC’s past that I am frankly unfamiliar with.

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mygif

@Zeno:

B’wana Beast. Morrison used him in his Animal Man run and he’s popped up in episodes of Justice League Unlimited (the one where Circe turns Wonder Woman into a pig) and Batman: the Brave & the Bold where he helps Bats fight a giant robot thingy. I think it was Black Manta’s…

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mygif

Mr. Speedo Giraffe would be B’wana Beast, a character so popular that he’s shown up in the funny books at least five times since his first appearance in the late 60s. He also popped up in a couple episodes of the Justice League Unlimited cartoon.

He’s even got a wikipedia entry you can check out: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bwana_beast

I would suggest that MGK use B’wana Beast as one of his upcoming Thursday Who’s Who posts, but I’m not sure if he even got a mention in the Who’s Who book.

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DistantFred said on January 25th, 2010 at 2:45 pm

Didn’t James Robinson turn B’wana Beast into Prometheus’s throw rug or something?

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mygif

No, that was Freedom Beast, the (black) successor to B’wana Beast invented by Morrison. I suspect now there will be a brand new B’wana Beast who will be white JUST LIKE IT WAS IN THE 1960s.

Speaking of James Robinson, note that Congo Bill shows up in the Africa panel as well (next to the giraffe).

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mygif

Part of me love love loves these ginormous world-threatening fights…and another part of me always instinctively looks for the hero (or villain) who’s so far out of his weight class that it might as well be *me* out there in tights. This time around I’m spoiled for choices, but Godiva? “They disintegrate what they touch–I’ll hit them with my hair!” How in HELL did she survive this?

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mygif

Beau Smith wrote a B’wana Beast short story for the 2009 DC Holiday Special.

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[...] Chris Bird takes a look at the big battle sequence in Crisis On Infinite Earths #12 [...]

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Mary Warner said on January 25th, 2010 at 3:53 pm

You said Cyborg was the biggest name on that page? Bigger than Aquaman or Green Arrow? I’ve always thought of Green Arrow as one of the most important heroes at DC, but I could be biased since I only read DC regularly in the ’70s.

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mygif

But that’s Earth-2 Green Arrow, the one who never developed a personality (possibly the only thing that wasn’t completely stolen from Batman and given an arrow related spin). Fair dues on Aquaman, though.

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mygif

Yeah, I didn’t think of that at first, but that panel has Starman (JSA, so E2) which means he’s basically a nobody. Of course, all the Earths are merged now, so wouldn’t he be both? I forget how this worked. There’s also Elongated Man punching someone in the Cyborg panel I think

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mygif

I think my favorite bits of that Shadow Demon stuff is the 2 pager that has Alan Scott and Dr. Occult Locked in that Trance to cage them all with Magic and Willpower

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mygif

yup

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Sean D. Martin said on January 25th, 2010 at 7:14 pm

The page turn reveal. Gods, I miss that.

I remember turning a page in one an Issue of Animal Man to find him looking right at me saying “I SEE YOU!” Damn if I didn’t slam the book shut. It was several seconds before my mind kicked in again and told me he really couldn’t.

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Jason Barnett said on January 25th, 2010 at 8:28 pm

The merged Earths didn’t merge individuals. I think the merged Earth was basically Earth-1 stretched slightly to allow places that only existed in one reality such as Keystone City to also be there.

People like the Earth-2 Robin found out the didn’t exist officially and never had.

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mygif

Things were still “settling in” at the end of Crisis, so certain anachronistic characters (like Earth-2 Robin) still existed even though there was no place for them in history. IIRC, Roy Thomas explained this away in “All-Star Squadron” as some powerful entity or other holding back the changes to history through sheer force of will, knowing that it would result in the erasure of some of her friends from the timeline.

(Pity poor Roy Thomas, by the way. He’d just gotten up to issue 50 of “All-Star Squadron”, his dream title that showcased and spotlighted all those classic Golden Agers, only to be told, “Um, hey, all of your continuity is being junked. Oh, and you have to cross over with the series that’s junking it.”)

I love this piece, MGK. I think that one of the reasons “Crisis” works so much better than “Infinite Crisis” and “Final Crisis” was that Wolfman and Perez came from an era before ‘decompression’. They had to learn how to tell stories economically, making the most use out of each page and each panel, and that comes out here. When they tell a story that’s twelve issues long, it freaking deserves every single issue of it. :)

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mygif

It’s shit like this is why I love this blog.

kudos.

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mygif

loved this post man
man, i still remember the first time i read the Crisis series

shit blew my mind

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mygif

But lets face it, Perez gets handed a penalty for Penguin vs Firestorm fight, as noted by Scipio

http://absorbascon.blogspot.com/2005/10/eight-fabulous-moments-in-coie.html

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mygif

This whole issue was so awesome that it even worked when I first read it in French, not a language I speak fluently.

Also awesome the heroes v. villains issue earlier in the series, again with great Perez storytelling through page composition, panel layout and positioning, E.g. showing Green Arrow and Black Canary fighting Punch and Jewelee in one panel.

Also great: the way in which Perez can reconcile (semi-)realistic and cartoony drawing styles for the zillions of characters involved in the Crisis, where e.g. Captain Marvel is still recognisable the classic cartoony Marvel, but doesn’t look ridiculous next to e.g. Batman, nor has these style differences in conflict.

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[...] from a scene in Crisis on Infinite Earths, DC Comics’ first mega-crossover, called the “Battle Around the World,” is a classic example of complex compression, a big fight scene with simply a lot of figures [...]

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