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mygif

I read as many as I could stand (got to about #55).

I remember when I gave up LOST in the first season. It was after Ethan came back (and died) and Locke had a kidney stolen by his dad in a flashback and then he discovered the shaft and week after week he just looked at it while everyone wondered if Walt and the pregnant woman’s baby were psychic and I came to the conclusion that it simply didn’t matter and that no answer would be worth all the build up. Yes, they are psychic. No, they are not psychic. Yes and no and it’s all a dream factory. Nothing was interesting me in the slightest and none of the characters drew enough emotional investment for me to continue. I liked Hurley, but that was it. And I hated, hated, hated, Jack, Sawyer, and Kate, and if you hate the three main characters of a show, I suppose it doesn’t matter if it’s Shakespeare: you’re not going to have a good time. (But then, I suppose Shakespeare wouldn’t write characters that people would hate.)

As my friends and the internet continued to discuss LOST I’d pick up tidbits here and there, but I never watched an episode (except the one with Nathan Fillion) again because I just could tell that it was a bad mystery, tolerable only if you liked the characters (which a lot of people did, but I didn’t; even Locke got annoying for me after his second flashback).

Now that LOST is over, every site and forum I go to is mentioning it, and here’s this list of all the plot points that weren’t/were resolved and I’m reading the questions and the answers and I have yet to find one plot point that is even remotely interesting.

The explanations I read seem to fall into one of these categories: “the island is weird”, “a stroke of luck”, and, “a wizard did it”.

LOST spent every episode talking about how terribly important everything in it was and then it either handwaves them away, ignores them, or deus ex machina’s its way out if it with psychic-spirtualistic oddities.

LOST and BATTLESTAR GALACTICA were very similar, really. Both had a refugee/survivalist bent that “arced” and continued over the seasons that was rather interesting, and both decided to fill that show with nonsense. 10 years ago, sci-fi did it with technobabble, now it is religibabble where they use spiritualism as magic to have anything happen and ‘tie things together’ even though they have no meaning. Shows about their own made-up mythology. Geordi using the phase-inducers to fix the dilithium core is exactly the same as having someone use some vague cryptic quasi-religious symbol that could mean anything in the first few episodes as “foreshadowing” and then have those things happening as an excuse for Lady Destiny to have any damn thing she wants happen. (Seriously; compare the foreshadowing and mystery-build-up in HEROES, LOST, and BSG to DAMAGES or BABYLON 5. They don’t even compare.)

But they’re not the first; THE X-FILES did it too (and while it made sense, it was never satisfactory). And while BSG really pissed me off, I stuck with it longer simply because I liked the characters (well, some of them…). If you like the characters you’ll stick with anything. Look at CSI.

I suppose all this LOST talk wouldn’t aggravate me so much if it hadn’t been on the air for 6 years while FIREFLY, MY NAME IS EARL, and DEADWOOD got cancelled and every “Top 10 TV Shows of the 2000s” list forgot that THE WIRE existed.

Apparently Eko was cool, though.

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Black Rabbit said on May 27th, 2010 at 1:01 pm

“One last chance to set things right.” Thanks for this list, MGK. I’m not ready to let go and move on yet.

#13. This was actually explained in-canon: on the Season 5 DVD set is included the ABC-produced “Mysteries of the Universe” fake Eighties TV show that, among other things, explicitly says that Eloise is still paying for the food drops.

#14. 1. Radzinsky built the Swan. 2. Radzinsky’s a paranoid bastard. 3. Radzinsky went mad and eventually blew his brains out trapped inside the Swan. Making multiple failsafes and hidden maps with crazy theories is entirely in-character.

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mygif

45.) I heard a pretty plausible theory somewhere that “R” stands for “Regina”.

Yeah, I know, the sickness. But maybe…

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mygif

Where’d it go… ah, here!

http://www.movieline.com/2010/05/rebutting-losts-questions.php

Movieline did the same thing, answering the questions. They took a few more serious approaches, but I think overlapping yours and theirs makes for a good combination of answers.

You’re right – there’s some questions that are actually resolved that people seemed to have missed, or not been able to think through at all. There are also some legitimate unanswered questions (my real one: Why did the Others react to the Losties the way that they did?) but also a number that were answered but some viewers seemed to miss it.

And, yeah, the Jin/Sun thing is I think easily answered by the candidate being Jin. The reason Kate went with them into the past? Because by coming back to the island to get Claire back to be Aaron’s real mother showed she was willing to give up her motherhood role for something more important.

And I love your explanation for Eko’s death that goes beyond the actor’s leaving, because they made a point of the character being pushed towards accepting the island as special, which makes his outright rejection of that and any attempts to manipulate him a perfect reason for the Monster to kill him.

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mygif
Somberbrero said on May 28th, 2010 at 5:35 am

Questions 1-96: God works in mysterious ways.

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mygif

“2.) What did Locke see when he saw the smoke monster? A smoke monster isn’t scary enough on its own now?”

That’s not the point. After seeing Smokey, Locke said that he looked into “the heart of the island, and it was beautiful.”

My best guess is that it took the form of Helen. But like much of the show, the writers left us to guess and make assumptions because they didn’t bother trying to write it in a way that was clear.

Still, I admire your hard work. You put a lot of thought into this. Good job!

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mygif

My answer to question 70 is that Sun was not a candidate, everyone who ended up in the 70s was a candidate, yes, even Vincent (who obviously went on to run the island after Hurley, and the most important time of his life was then he was running the show, which is why he wasn’t in the church).

It also answers the question of which Kwon was a candidate, for people interested in that.

/my theories.

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davekan said on June 4th, 2010 at 7:04 pm

Your answers are all good, but honestly, I don’t really care what you think the answers are. In fact, I don’t really care what I think the answers are. I care about the answers that the writers should have provided (not to say that all of these questions were equally important). All of these things, especially in the early seasons, were brought up as important things in the show. And they are in fact why I liked watching the show, the mysteries of the island, the dharma initiative, the others, Walt, etc.. The ending provided by the writers basically tells us that none of that stuff really mattered, in fact none of the characters even mattered, because it was just one cycle in the ongoing cycle of people protecting or exploiting the island. What did Jack’s sacrifice really mean, he stopped something BAD from happening. But we never really know what, just ominous warnings of everyone we love being gone. After Jack put the cork in and died, Hurley and Ben went on to protect the island from the next set of castaways (maybe even the Harlem Globetrotters!). And then they died, and someone else took over Without a deeper explanation of what it all meant, what was the point of their lives, of their sacrifice?

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mygif

davekan, I think the real question you’re asking is “What was the point of making a tv show about it?”

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mygif

I am so tired of these types of flippant posts. If you’re just going to answer all the questions with “that’s just the way it is” then why bother writing anything at all? At least be a little helpful. For example: why does the smoke monster make mechanical sounds? Since we heard the monster a whole lot before we ever got to see it, one could assume that the producers avoided revealing its true nature in order to extend the mystery. So one might assume that the sounds it makes were a jumble of organic and inorganic so as to keep the viewer confused as to what it really was and amplify the idea that this was something no one had ever seen before. Furthermore, it’s also very possible that the producers/writers didn’t even know what the monster was going to be until they finally decided to show it, so they made it sound as ambiguous as possible. Or, maybe it was all just “island magic!” Yeah, that’s it.

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