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mygif

My first guess is Captain America, with a distant second being Superman.

The voice is friendly and casual, yet respectful. The voice is too soft for any of the darker toned characters, too laid-back to be one of the smarties, too old-fashioned for one of the younger characters, and too familiar with actual war to be a casual hero.

Hence, Captain America.

Superman is second because he has similar verbal patterns, but, while a fighter, he’s still not the warrior that Cap is.

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mygif

Seems a little speechy for Spidey, and a little anti-reg for Iron Man. I’m gonna say… Daredevil?

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mygif

i first thought john wayne, but, that’s because i’d been listening to “rappin’ duke” recently.
then, dubya.
now, i can’t get “that” type of voice out of my head.

good tip & great site.

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mygif

Oh, duh, it’s about THE Civil War, not Civil War. That’s what I get for skimming. Okay, I say Cap, too.

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mightybaldking said on September 10th, 2007 at 9:34 am

I’m interested in how The Hulk would deliver it.

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The first character that came to mind was actually Buffy.

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BitterCupOJoe said on September 10th, 2007 at 9:48 am

I’m gonna go with the Thing.

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mygif

Oh God, I think I’m printing this off for my students today.

Not that they know who Brainiac 5 is, but still.

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mygif

Very Buffy. That was my first thought, anyway. Maybe Spidey, but more Buffy.

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“Hulk Smash puny greycoats”?

Really, it would be funny to see the full length, with ‘long long time ago, hulk’s home got made, then hulk’s friends got smashed, now HULK will smash!’, but does the Hulk really give a speech about ANYTHING? Except who broke that chair in the Avengers Mansion kitchen, of course (me STILL think it the dog. That dog no good).

No serious guesses, but I don’t see Superman saying ‘ninety-odd’, ninety-odd says ‘older sensibility’ to me. I like the Cap theory, but that’s because I didn’t see ‘snikt bub’ anywhere in there.

Do they have an entry for ‘generic 50 year old downhome patriot’? Uncle Sam? Nick Fury?

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mygif

Oh, and another vote for Buffy. Casual, almost vapid diction addressing lofty ideals, and a tendency to personalize her causes. Spidey maybe, but it’s not smart enough for Peter Parker.

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mygif

“Ninety-odd years ago.” It’s not captain america. Way too informal for Cap, particularly in reference to the founding of America.

“our mothers and fathers” It’s an interesting tic, definitely feminist (post feminist)

“our friends and family have fallen” not soldiers or boys. friends and family

“And we’re going to win, because we have to win.” steel-ly resolve, phrased ineloquently.

Buffy.

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mygif

Is it She Hulk?

I can’t think of any other female comic book characters that have their own series other than Ms Marvel and Wonder Woman and it doesn’t sound like either of them to me.

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mygif

This is going to be a “me too” post. I read this through the RSS feed, so I didn’t get to read any of the comments before guessing. But about halfway through, and especially toward the end, yeah. I thought about Buffy. It does sound like the few speeches she’s given in her own series.

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mygif

Well, dang.

I never even thought of Buffy as a comic character, and I missed the mothers – fathers reversal, so I think I may change it to Buffy too, but does she count as a major comics heroine? If not, I’m completely unfamiliar with the personality of the current Supergirl, could it be her?

Although… the use of “mothers and fathers” is jarringly formal in this otherwise casual speech. And I disagree that it’s necessarily post-feminist, as it is not uncommon to say “mom and dad,” though the more formal speech does usually have fathers before mothers…

Now I’m all confused.

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mygif

Seems like the Thing to me. Close second being Spider-Man. I’d think Cap would be a touch more formal than that.

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CandidGamera said on September 10th, 2007 at 11:52 am

It’s not how I’d envision Buffy giving the speech – not quite enough flippancy. Though the “ninety-odd” mistake seems buffylike enough.

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CandidGamera said on September 10th, 2007 at 11:58 am

On the other hand, I can see Malcolm Reynolds delivering it exactly that way.

But he doesn’t currently have a comic.

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mygif

Sounds more like Supergirl. Added bonus that she’s also in the Legion.

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I’m saying it isn’t Buffy; it’s not quite her, there’s not enough..I don’t even know what you call it, but even when she speechifies, she doesn’t stay on point that well, IMO

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mygif

My first guess was Spider-Man as well, but it seems just a little off for him. However, on multiple reads it seems to fit better. Or, I’m justifing.

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mygif

Interesting exercise, Chris.

I’d agree with it being Buffy, but for this fragment: “and we owe them the willingness to pay that price ourselves”; which is a bit awkward. If it’s Buffy, Willow wrote that part for her. Or rather, Willow wrote the whole speech, and that’s the only bit she remembers.

I think it’s probably Peter Parker (not Spiderman; the voices of the character are different). But in the interests of at least guessing someone that hasn’t been mentioned….

Hmm. Huntress could do it, but I’m not sure she counts as having her own title through BoP, and the school teacher wouldn’t say 90 odd years ago.

I think my guess is Green Lantern Jon Stewart (or maybe Steel, but that’s because the comics version of Steel seems to be cribbing heavily from the Dini-Verse JLU Stewart from what I saw in 52) though I’m not sure either of them has their own comic these days.

Now, what does it say about your exercise that this sample has gotten so many varied answers–that all, in my view, could be considered accurate. All of the characters mentioned could give this speech this way, and not seem out of character, even if it’s not perfectly in character. I think it reveals something about how the reader perceives character voice in their own head, I’m just not sure what. I’d also be interested in knowing how many of the commentators also do some writing.

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mygif

Well, Joe, first off, with the exception of the Thing (and I’ll say right now that it’s not the Thing), the answers given in multiples are Captain America, Spider-Man/Peter Parker and Buffy. I think the patriotic nature of the speech reinforces, for some people, the voice of Captain America when they read it. As for Spidey and Buffy, they happen to be two characters with an awful lot in common.

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The only Marvel character I can think of that is part of a title and would be irresponsible enough with a speech like that is The Human Torch.

From DC, my guess would be either Flash or Booster Gold. Anyone who uses “our mothers and fathers” instead of “our forefathers” just can not be the sharpest tool in the shed.

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mygif

Hawkeye?

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mygif

Anyone who uses “our mothers and fathers” instead of “our forefathers” just can not be the sharpest tool in the shed.

I don’t see that at all, sorry.

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mygif

I read and saw the following

Gettysburg Speaker: Ninety-odd years ago, our mothers and fathers made a new country out of nothing, where we were all free and we were all equal.
Black men and white women in the audience: Oh really? Where is this country located?

Sorry, but that screams “idealistic yet historically uninformed” to me. which in my mind, I see as someone who would just as easily stick his foot in his mouth as use it to kick some bad guy’s ass. If it wasn’t a title character, I would have said it was Miss Floyd from Civil War.

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Black men and white women in the audience: Oh really? Where is this country located?

Yes, because not allowing for different social mores of the period is the height of reasonable discourse.

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mygif

True on the Spidey/Buffy comparison. But it’s not just the multiples that ring as plausible when I read this. Waid’s Supergirl isn’t impossible. Malcom Reynolds of Firefly could have said this (but not the harsher Mal of Serenity.) Some versions of She Hulk could have said this, but not Dan Slott’s. Torch and Booster both occurred to me, but I’m not familiar with how Torch’s being written these days and I don’t have enough experience with Booster to say for sure. Flash didn’t occur to me, but I can hear Michael Rosenbaum reading this as if I’d just been watching it on the screen.

That’s one of the interesting things about a shared universe. There are so many different takes on individual voices that you can make a convincing argument for any of these people. And as soon as you tell us who you intended it to be, it will click, and we will hear the passage in the variant–tone, pacing, etc–that makes sense for that individual, and we will all think it is inherently obvious and not understand how we could have thought it was anyone else. But really, all of the guesses will still be “correct” in some ways.

It’s part of the reason I’m wondering how many of us commenting are writers. How many of us are looking at this and trying to deconstruct it to see who said it…and how many of us are trying to figure out who we can get to say this?

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mygif

I’d say…Ms. Marvel.

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[i]Yes, because not allowing for different social mores of the period is the height of reasonable discourse.[/i]

Then you’re not writing for the character. You’re writing for the time.

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mygif

Oddly, it read like the JSA’s Stargirl to me.

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Zenrage: Just engage your suspension of disbelief. Assume that the world that the character is speaking in is a world in which he/she/it would say those things. It’s not really that bit a point; it’s not about the content of the speech, it’s about the voice the speech is made in.

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mygif

I got it! Ultimate Cap! A little more down-to-earth than the 616 one, which accounts for the casual speech, but the same guy at heart.

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mygif

Hmmm. You’ve got a thing for DC, so I’m betting it’s a DC character.

The mothers and fathers thing is probably accurate. It’s too odd to be accidental.

It must be an American character, I think, because of the pointed reference.

People who know a lot of large words tend to use them, so the character probably doesn’t.

There’s not a lot of playfulness there either.

Carol Danvers? She’s not DC, but the rest seems to fit, mostly. And she has an ongoing.

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mygif

I’m not sure I understand why the reaction of the audience makes something in or out of character, nevermind the fact that it’s supposed to be a specific character’s version of the speech, not dialogue (hence, no reaction from anyone, be they black, white, asian, hispanic, native american, or whatever)

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Joe H: If you are writing for the time period and you feel that time period should overshadow the nature of what makes that character special in any time period, then how can you claim to be doing the character any benefit?

Its not about suspending disbelief. Its about staying true to the character. The character who spoke in this speech is made out to be ignorant of history and ultimately exclusionary. I’m not saying MGK did it on purpose. I’m just saying he overshot the intended target.

Do you think Spider-man would start acting like J. Jonah Jameson if he was ever put in charge of the Daily Bugle?

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mygif

Its not about suspending disbelief. Its about staying true to the character. The character who spoke in this speech is made out to be ignorant of history and ultimately exclusionary.

You’re continuing to completely miss the point, which is not “reinterpret the events in the viewpoint of the character” but rather “reinterpret the speech patterns in the character’s speaking voice.” If it makes you feel better, pretend that the civil war in question is actually happening on planet Zarko.

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mygif

I know I’m wrong, but honestly, I read it as Pa Kent.

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mygif

It definitely felt like Spidey to me, although I gotta admit, the guy who said it’s specifically Peter Parker’s voice got me thinking.

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The more I read it, the more I hear Henry Fonda’s voice. It’s gotta be Superman.

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mygif

I’m a little late to the party, but I’m going to guess Kitty Pride. Considering she was who Buffy was modeled on (more or less), the Buffy guesses make sense to me. :)

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I say that’s Captain Marvel. It’s got that peculiar mixture of childishness, idealism, and adult knowledge.

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mygif

Soooo who is it? Or have I simply missed the second part somewhere in the archives. Incidentally I almost immediately read it as Buffy so it will be interesting to see who it is and place it in their voice. (I think it was the ‘we have to win’ that did it for me)

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mygif

Reminds me of Black Canary.

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mygif

So I’m the only one that thinks it’s Tony Stark?

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mygif

Hmm… Tony Stark? Nnnnnnahhhhh…. not quite. He could say it, but it’d be weird for him. It’s easier to parse who it isn’t than figure out *BINGO!* who it is.

The passive voice is *everywhere* here.

“where we were all free and we were all equal. ”

There’s repetition in that line, as well as passivity. That kind of voice is usually for the more cerebral thinkers, the Prof X’s, but they’re a bit too smart for that.

” and we owe them the willingness to pay that price ourselves, if we have to.”

That’s out of character from the other comments. Whoever’s speaking has to know some of this from experience, in some way or another.

… Nope. No idea. Tell ussssss!

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mygif

…. Barbara Gordon? (Am I too late to the party?)

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Danger Bear said on March 2nd, 2009 at 5:00 pm

Now I am way late the party, but I just had to say that the speaker sounds to me like Frank Castle, the Punisher. Maybe its because I just read your Civil War parody and Castle’s constant narration had me cracking up.

Imagine the Punisher thinking that Gettysburg Address at the end of Civil War when he picks up Cap’s discarded mask. Its got that whole “use dead people as an excuse to soldier on” vibe to it.

Will I ever know for sure?

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mygif

Well, this is ages after the original posting, so maybe even you don’t remember any more, but I’m going to guess Tim Drake as Robin (pre Batman death, obviously.). It’s got that quiet optimism that represents Tim, IMO.

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I’m surprised no one’s mentioned Kitty Pryde. A little bit of awkwardness at speaking in public, but idealistic, sentimental, without humorous self-denigration or a kitschy speaking style, and a hint of deep philosophical intelligence. That’s what sprung out to me, but she doesn’t have her own tytle. Maybe she was on one of those mini-series.

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And, actually bothering to check, I see that Robin already guessed Kitty.

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The “made from nothing” bit makes me think of Wonder Woman, for some reason.

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Owesome said on May 4th, 2015 at 3:59 am

I’m a little ticked that we’ll never get the canonical answer, but for me that speech just screams “Squirrel Girl.”

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