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mygif

One problem I do potentially see is, well- Odysseus told a bunch of guys to go and kill a kid. That’s fine and dandy in Greek mythology, but I’m not sure why a modern superhero would necessarily be eager to team up with him.

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Evan Waters,

In actual Norse mythology Thor is Odin’s brother, not his son. A little creative rewriting is not always unheard of when translating mythology to comic canon.

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Sofa King said on April 28th, 2009 at 12:16 am

And if someone doesn’t know who Odysseus’ is, why should they care about this arc? I’m sure those people are few and far between, but still.

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mygif

To Five Eyes: Y’know the whole basis of my initial joke is that Creaky wouldn’t know better. Considering how many alien worlds MGK’s Odysseus has been on, it stands to reason that most of his opponents over the past 17 years haven’t known any better either. I could totally see him becoming convinced that the horse thing is the greatest infiltration tactic ever.

To Snap Wilson and HitTheTargets: Not every Dr Strange story needs to be centered around something that’s already part of his little corner of the MU. The whole “why MGK should write Dr Strange” thing seems as much a vehicle for fantasy and horror stories that MGK wants to tell as the LoSH thing was for science fiction.

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mygif

To HitTheTargets and Snap Wilson:

I could easily see the basics of this get covered in half an issue, an issue tops, followed by Oddysseus joining the supporting cast for a while until Strange works out how to get him home, with some of Oddysseus’ past trips being relevant to whatever other stories are being told.

Basically this idea is a fantastic example of the toybox rule that MGK mentioned in I Should Write the Legion, as it could give other writers a ton of things to play with.

Admittedly, I pretty much want to see an I Should Write Odysseus series now, as this is my favourite idea so far.

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Lister Sage said on April 28th, 2009 at 8:43 am

Bret: The original Death’s Head was the Transformers character the Doctor encountered. He went from hunting Transformers in the TF UK series. Shrunk by the Doctor with the Master’s stolen TCE weapon. To showing up in various Marvel US comics. Transformers is technically MU canon as well. Both with their original series and the New Avengers/Transformers crossover a year or so ago.

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mygif

I know.

Hence, the “Yes?”

Heck, I have an issue of Fantastic Four with the guy. (It’s a good one, by the way.)

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mygif

Seconding the “fuck yeah Pendulum”, incidentally.

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mygif

I thought Chronos and the other titans were banished by Zeus and the olympians. I might be weong

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Lister Sage said on April 28th, 2009 at 1:39 pm

Bret: Ah, I thought it was “I’m not sure, which is why I’m adding a question mark” type things. So I figured I’d confirm your “suspsions”.

saca: Different Cronos. There’s a Titan Cronos and a God Khronos. I made the same mistake.

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mygif

Zenrage: In actual Norse mythology Thor is Odin’s brother, not his son. A little creative rewriting is not always unheard of when translating mythology to comic canon.

Being Scandinavian, I’ve been subjected to Norse mythology on a weekly basis since I was ten years old, and I’ve never heard of Thor being anything other than Odin’s son. Loki on the other hand is variously described as Thor’s half-brother, Odin’s adoptive son and Odin’s blood brother. Maybe you mixed something up there?

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mygif

Neil Gaiman once referenced Loki as being ‘a giant who went to live with the gods’. Is it possible that he was just some malevolent force which no-one could define?

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mygif

In actual Norse mythology Thor is Odin’s brother, not his son. A little creative rewriting is not always unheard of when translating mythology to comic canon.

Admittedly, not cannon, but Wiki disagrees with you.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thor#Family

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mygif

I’m thinking Loki is so tricksy he spun his writers around and made them give him several conflicting backstories so no one would know for sure. Which I guess puts him ahead of every other trickster god. >_>

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Kid Kyoto said on April 29th, 2009 at 2:43 am

Not to throw water on a fire but who is this a Dr. Strange story? Would you spend an issue or two on Ulysses’ back story to get into Doc Strange or just throw him in and catch up later?

This works better as a Ulysses in modern day NY story than a Dr. Strange pitch.

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mygif

Odey is not to be confused with Oedi, a play parodying Oedipus.

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mygif

I think you’re worrying too much about the exposition. These aren’t really single story pitches, but more like sections of the story bible. They are there to lay groundwork and ensure consistency. Most of this wont come into the scripting unless a specific storyline requires it. Odysseus isn’t going to show up at Strange’s door and spend ten pages detailing his history. He’s going to tell the Cliff Notes version and ask for help. Two issues later, when they run into Laestri on Earth, he’ll fill that in in a handful of panels.
Oh, and the surviving original Norse eddas are contradictory in any number of ways. Their religion never got organized enough for everyone to get together and vote for which version was canon, like the Catholics did.

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mygif

“Loki is so tricksy he spun his writers around and made them give him several conflicting backstories so no one would know for sure. Which I guess puts him ahead of every other trickster god”

… except the Joker.

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