40 users responded in this post

Subscribe to this post comment rss or trackback url
mygif

I have to disagree with you about GLC. Yes, it is definitely a continuationof what came before, but it also sets up your 3 P’s in this issue. It explains the job of the Green Lantern Corps, in the first few pages you get the sense of what the Corps do. We’re introduced to Guy and John and we learn a bit about them. We also get introduced to Salaak and see what his role in the Corps is (though it would have been nice if we got a bit more from the other members of the Corps.) And we have plot of the story (someone is taking out Green Lanterns and slaughtering planets.) You may not have liked the actual content, but I think it works fine as a #1 issue.

And did anyone really expect LSH to be anything else but s simple renumbering? I’m not saying, it was a wise idea, just not at all surprising.

Also, as much as I like him, at this point I should learn to avoid anything featuring Roy Harper. It’ll just end badly.

ReplyReply
mygif

Oh and DC should have waited like six months to do another Nightwing series. If Dick’s future wasn’t assured, the ending of Batman #1 would have been a lot more interesting.

ReplyReply
mygif

Nightwing and Supergirl were both just kind of there, for me. Not good enough to praise, not bad enough to attack. Just there.

Red Hood and the Outlaws, though… That’s one of the worst comics I have ever read in my life. Fuck, Hawk and Dove was better than that mess.

ReplyReply
mygif

Oh, please, PLEASE MGK…do an extended evisceration of Red Hood. Please.

ReplyReply
mygif

Wait, Blue Beetle is a hard reboot? Why even bother doing a complete do over of a series that’s only about five years old anyway? If there’s one series that should have gotten the Resurrection Man/Static/GL “this is just the next issue of the previous series” treatment then this is it.

Also, it just hit me; Nightwing isn’t attached to any teams now, is he? Why is the best leader in the DCU not part of a team? This may be an even bigger mistake than thin Amanda Waller.

ReplyReply
mygif

Paco was a gang-banger in the original series. He just wasn’t drawn Thug Life style. He ran with a super-powered gang and stole cars…

ReplyReply
mygif

In the original series Paco’s “gang” mostly helped illegals cross the border and beat up kidnappers. That isn’t really what comes to mind when I hear “gang banger”.

ReplyReply
mygif

To clarify a bit more; Paco was always a criminal but he was a criminal that helped people … like Batman (seriously, how many federal laws does Bruce break on a daily basis?)

Heck, the previous Blue Beetle series was quite fond of pointing out that Superman is an illegal alien.

ReplyReply
mygif

Red Hood and the Outlaws, in theory, is a good book. DC has traditionally suffered from having a lack of “gray but still mostly good guys” type of heroes and RHatO is a step in that direction (and with characters that fit well into that theme)………….

But then it goes right out with the window with sexually objectified Starfire and overtly douchebag Jason Todd. Seriously why is it writers constantly have to center Jason’s “beingadickness” around an obsession of getting over on Dick Grayson? (well actually I know why, thank you Grant Morrison)

ReplyReply
mygif

My problem with Blue Beetle was that, to me, it lacked the sheer sense of fun the previous title possessed.

ReplyReply
mygif

In all fairness KD it’s gotten to the point where Starfire is sexually objectified whenever she appears on the page anywhere. It’s just that this book took it to such absurd extremes.

ReplyReply
mygif
Pantsless Pete said on September 22nd, 2011 at 12:02 pm

You know, thinking on that Blue Beetle thing, there is probably a whole essay to be written about how comic fans are a whole lot less comfortable confronting issues of racism in comics than they are sexism or homophobia.

ReplyReply
mygif
Cookie McCool said on September 22nd, 2011 at 12:07 pm

Poor Kitty. When will she ever be able to buy her own damn wine coolers?

ReplyReply
mygif

You know, my wife’s favorite DC character is Starfire, thanks to the Teen Titans cartoon. Specifically, the episode where Killer Moth held the city hostage so Robin would take his daughter to the prom.

I think Red Hood would make her cry.

ReplyReply
mygif
Menamebephil said on September 22nd, 2011 at 4:05 pm

I’m with Mrs. Brian G on this one. If you want consistently good stories with DC characters, all you have to do is watch pretty much any of the TV series based on the comics. Waller’s even fat in Justice League.

ReplyReply
mygif

I wouldn’t be so bothered with Blue Beetle #1 if only they didn’t spend half the book speaking in Spanish.

And I say that as a Mexican guy. One or two words, that’s fine, but really, LATINO PEOPLE DON’T SPEAK LIKE THAT. I’m not Latino (really, I was born and raised in Mexico) but all my relatives in the US speak English, and they don’t feel the need to substitute random words in Spanish for no reason at all.

ReplyReply
mygif

I really wanted to like Red Hood. I mean, a book about two snaky burnout ex-sidekicks turned mercs sounds fun as hell. (And the first few pages did live up to that even) And since I have zero prior interest or knowledge about Starfire, her role as a zero personality high octane energy blaster/nymhpocheesecake girl didn’t seem to bother me *quite* as much as it did other people (in fact at the risk of getting bitched at, I’ll even give their clumsy attempt to distance her from Dick Grayson a thumbs up, because yeah, that bit of back story seems silly as hell, 20 years later, whenever it is brought up in a Nightwing book) So for me, the book didn’t really take a nose dive into suck until WTF Cryptic Zombie Woman showed up to give Jason her random generic cryptic warnings about some random generic shadowy organization and the random generic cryptic evil force that is threatening it.

ReplyReply
mygif

Hey MGK,

Do you think Catwoman and Red Hood were this (http://www.comicsalliance.com/2011/09/22/starfire-catwoman-sex-superheroine/) sexist?

ReplyReply
mygif
David Fullam said on September 22nd, 2011 at 6:22 pm

Good to see a democratic response to all these sites that are giving out 4-5 star reviews to all these book like candy.

ReplyReply
mygif

I bought almost every ultimate comic that came out up until Ultimatum, and then I gave up.

Have the wounds from Ultimatum finally scabbed over? Is it worth getting back into?

ReplyReply
mygif

I checked out Ultimate X-Men #1. It was actually really good, but yeah, it is hard to ignore the stink of the Ultimate Universe on it.

ReplyReply
mygif

@ Question: You do realize the comics panels used there are from the very comics he’s talking about, right?

ReplyReply
mygif

Ah, dammit, I didn’t need to know that about Paco.

ReplyReply
mygif

I loved Tony Bedard’s writing on Great Ten, and had high hopes for Blue Beetle… I haven’t read it yet, but everything I hear fills me with dread.

Very strong recommendation for Ultimate Comics X-Men, huh? I thought it looked pretty good but I wasn’t going to get it because of the $3.99 price tag, but if it’s that good I’ll give it another look.

ReplyReply
mygif
Kristopher A said on September 22nd, 2011 at 10:55 pm

Interesting. I thought UXM was good, but not ground-breaking. I mean, compared to the other Ultimate stuff coming out it’s damn good in that it’s intelligible as well as moving at a good clip, but I guess I didn’t get the fantastic feel that you get.

Then again, I liked most of the stuff you felt ambivalent about, so perhaps I’m jsut a plebe.

I like that you gave at least a fair shake to Catwoman before you ripped it for what it properly deserved. In all honesty, if you make the penultimate page the final page and take the caption from the final page, you really defuse the worst of the comic. To get a good comic you’d probably need to cut the cheesecake by about 75%, but that’s besides the point

ReplyReply
mygif
Kristopher A said on September 23rd, 2011 at 1:57 am

Okay, let me explain my opinion of UXM a bit better, as I was kind of in a hurry when I typed up my original post. I guess what I’m so confused about is that you say it’s better than any of the nu52 when it’s obviously constructed with different ideas and goals in mind.

UXM is not something I would recommend for people who haven’t followed the Ultimate Universe. In fact, it’s like what Hickman’s Ultimates was (and failed) at: Something which is trying to work new and exciting things while getting back to the best parts of the Ultimate Universe. While it does explain a lot of things (or at least gives you what you need to know), the biggest part really requires that you’ve been following Ultimate comics for a while.

Other than that, I’m kind of sad that the reveal of the Weapon X secret on the public basically gets three small panels of “Generic Unrest!” which feel like they could have been taken right out of Fear Itself. The concept of Weapon X is great and that’s something I really want to see: I want to see people attacking labs which produce vaccines, reaction from world leaders on the subject, etc. There’s so much more that could have been done there that just wasn’t. A lot of what was established in the Press Conference is kind of par for the course with the X-Men already: camps, mistreatment, kill orders. It definitely feels like it fits more than the Ultimate Universe (Mark Millar’s early run felt too wild and out there; this feels a lot more grounded), which is something that is really heartening for a guy who has the vast majority of Ultimates material in hardcover on his shelves.

My final misgiving? It is really, really tied into the other titles. If your read Hickman’s stuff, you’ll understand. Hopefully it will not tie in too much, but from what I understand the unifying concept of the Ultimate universe is going to be about inter-connectivity and cohesiveness. That worries me after reading Ultimates and Hawkeye. But on a re-reading, I appreciate it more than I did. I just don’t want to get invested too much in a universe which has screwed me over a lot recently (Something I’m sure you can relate with and probably why I can enjoy DC’s stuff more than you).

In contrast, GLC wasn’t the greatest #1, but I could probably hand that to anyone and they’d probably feel like they were in on the ground floor. GLC doesn’t have the most exciting plot, but it’s characters are fleshed out for the reader, as well as the powers of the ring and what the GLC is. While it could draw on a great deal of continuity, it obviously was meant to serve as an introduction rather than completely shake up the previous status quo.

Wow. I wrote a lot more than I thought I would.

ReplyReply
mygif

I’m honestly not all that surprised by the Kitty bit. Ultimate Kitty is probably one of the best and certainly most interesting characters in Ultimate-verse, despite the fact (probably because of, really) she’s never really the focus of any comics. She actually has a relatively different story and character beats (you know, the whole point of the whole Ultimate thing)!

ReplyReply
mygif

In non-related but nonetheless very important news, turns out the true fate of Omar Little has been revealed in Community: He got caught, served his time, and became a Doctor in biology during his time in prison. Awe yeah. You come at the king.

ReplyReply
mygif

Wonder Woman is the prototypical character that you don’t need to give the origin for especially in the first issue. It comes off annoying when people expect every book to open with the origin just like people are trained to view Superhero movies that style is tired and there is more than one way to do it.

That book looks amazing, introduces the main characters, introduces the conflict, provides action and set up the future stories.

It is heads and shoulders the best of the reboot.

ReplyReply
mygif

The Spanglish in BB#1 bothered me too. The old book didn’t need it, and it felt layered on with a trowel.

Wonder Woman was just too “dark and gritty” for me- the idea that they’re making this a horror book just feels fundamentally wrong. It’s going again to the “she’s a Greek warrior!” well without bringing in any of the other stuff that makes her a unique character.

ReplyReply
mygif

I’ve become convinced over the years that Wonder Woman is just a hard character to write. She doesn’t really have a niche to call her own. They keep trying this “urban fantasy” theme and every time, its just blah. Here’s an idea: how about we write her as a superhero! Fighting supervillains!

ReplyReply
mygif

Its so crazy, it just might work….

ReplyReply
mygif
the Prowler said on September 25th, 2011 at 7:57 am

Wonder Woman is highly overrated, and a waste of Cliff Chiang’s superlative talents to boot. Also, I agree with Kaisius: she seems to be stuck in an urban fantasy ghetto of ever-diminishing returns. Urban Fantasy is a good genre for books and movies because it juxtaposes normal, everyday life with the fantastic and, in the case of the latter, is very cost-effective. However, the superhero genre already mixes the normal and the fantastic (albeit in its own funky way), and comics have an unlimited budget. In other words, stop bludgeoning us over the head with Greek myth – it’s completely played out.

Plus, that new costume is even worse than last year’s redesign.

ReplyReply
mygif

I was never a “Marvel maniac”; I was a “Marvel Zombie”, thankyouverymuch. :)

ReplyReply
mygif

The problem as I saw it with LSH #1 is that, on top of it not being a new reader-friendly issue, there are significant parts of it that are mysteries even to those of us who had been following the re-established Legion (i.e., from the “Superman and the Legion of Superheroes” storyline in Action Comics on).

Things happened that the characters talk about as common knowledge (such as the “Flashpoint Effect” impeding time travel, and something that was the genesis of Legion Lost), but they apparently happened off-panel and there’s zero indication that we’re going to be given any details in-print. I even went against my usual principles and downloaded a scan of Legion Lost #1, just to see if any information is provided there, but no dice. The impression I get from both of these stories is, “hey, this stuff happened, but it’s part of the brand-new, instant history that comes with the DCnU, and nobody has to explain it if they don’t want to”.

When your “jumping-on point” is so, as MGK put it, impenetrable that even longtime readers are unsure what’s going on, you’re failing at pretty much everything that your relaunch was intended to accomplish.

ReplyReply
mygif

avid Fullam said:

Good to see a democratic response to all these sites that are giving out 4-5 star reviews to all these book like candy.

You mean like Newsarama, which has become so sensitive about accusations of shilling for DC that its Facebook representative has started prefacing FB posts for their articles with snarky comments aimed at people who don’t like the DCnU?

For example, a link to an article about New 52 titles selling out (which, like so many, fails to note the vital detail that this means that Diamond Distributors has sold out of copies, and by no means guarantees that all of those copies will be purchased at retail) was posted to Newsarama’s FB page with an oh-so-smarmy:

“First reader to ‘Yeah, but what really counts is what they’re selling 6 months from now’ wins!”

Nice one, person representing Newsarama on Facebook–that totally proves that you are completely unbiased on this subject.

ReplyReply
mygif

Oops…sorry for cutting off the “D” in your name, David. Must have been a little clumsy with the cut’n’paste.

ReplyReply
mygif

MGK and anyone else, did you catch Ultimates #2? Talk about dropping bombs…

ReplyReply
mygif

I gotta say, Red Hood started off as a decent, if cliche, jailbreak/fallen hero romp that was rolling pretty well….until the first boob joke.

It was all downhill from there.

ReplyReply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Please Note: Comment moderation may be active so there is no need to resubmit your comments